WEIRD NEWS
01/15/2016 08:34 am ET

This Guy Wants Popcorn Banned Inside Movie Theaters

Would you sign Mike Shotton's petition?

Enough is enough for a frustrated movie fan who's calling for popcorn to be banned from theaters because he says it's too noisy.

Mike Shotton, 39, from Newcastle in northeast England, says his enjoyment of films is constantly ruined by others chomping down on the snack.

His recent viewing of "Star Wars: The Force Awakens" was spoiled by children rustling and chowing down on popcorn, according to the Daily Express.

So he wants its sale and consumption to be outlawed in all U.K. movie houses. But, so far, he's only gained 126 signatures on PetitionBuzz.com.

That's way less than the 573,000 who have so far signed a petition on the U.K. government's official website calling for GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump to be banned from visiting the United Kingdom.

Mike Shotton wants to ban popcorn from being sold inside all U.K. movie theaters
SWNS.com
Mike Shotton wants to ban popcorn from being sold inside all U.K. movie theaters

Shotton complains on the petition site that theater chains "bombard us with constant reminders to be quiet during the film and then they sell the loudest food known to man on the premises."

He describes popcorn as being loud, smelly and tasting of nothing -- and "sharing a consistency with weakened polystyrene." 

"I call on you now to stand with me, and tell cinema chains, the government and the world at large, that no longer are we prepared to let open mouthed grazers ruin our film viewing," he adds.

The campaign is yet to catch on, however, and a counter petition was actually launched to argue that "popcorn is an essential part of the cinema experience," reports SWNS.com.

Shotton challenged the rival petition organizer to a signature duel, where the person who gained the least backing by a specific date agreed to back down. He won by 106 to 92 and now plans to hand out leaflets outside movie theaters asking people not to buy popcorn inside.

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