POLITICS
10/02/2018 04:53 pm ET

Rashida Tlaib Arrested While Participating In 'Fight For 15' Rally In Detroit

The House candidate from Michigan was one of at least 20 people detained during the pro-labor demonstration.

Rashida Tlaib, a Democratic candidate for the U.S. House of Representatives, was arrested Tuesday in Detroit while participating in a pro-labor rally in support of union rights for all fast food workers.

Tlaib, who seeks to represent Michigan’s 13th congressional district, was one of at least 20 demonstrators arrested during the “Fight for 15” rally, which drew hundreds of striking fast food cooks and cashiers, as well as activists and elected leaders.

Police detained Tlaib and others after they refused to move from their seats at a table set up in the middle of a street, reported The Detroit News. They will be issued citations for a disorderly conduct misdemeanor and receive a court date, Detroit Police Deputy Chief Elvin Barren told the outlet.

“Rashida is released and fine and is proud of the other 13 women and four men who participated in this action with her,” a spokeswoman for Tlaib told HuffPost in an email.

A representative for the Detroit Police Department did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment.

The rally was part of a national walkout meant to draw attention to union rights ahead of the November midterm elections. Tlaib, a former member of the Michigan House of Representatives, has adopted an unapologetically pro-labor platform that pushes for increasing the minimum wage to $15.

“You know I couldn’t go too easily,” Tlaib tweeted Tuesday after her arrest. “This is too important!”

“The right to organize and build unions in our country is how we fight back for good jobs and fair pay,” she added. “Unfortunately, many have sold us out to greedy corporations who want to take away that right. Not on my watch.”

Tlaib is poised to become the first Muslim woman in Congress with her all-but-guaranteed win in November. She is aiming to take over John Conyers’ seat in Congress after he retired in December amid sexual misconduct allegations.

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