RELIGION
04/28/2014 12:47 pm ET Updated Apr 28, 2014

Rowan Williams, Former Archbishop Of Canterbury, Calls Britain 'A Post-Christian Country'

Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams receives an honorary degree at St Andrews University in St Andrews, Fife, Scot
Former Archbishop of Canterbury Rowan Williams receives an honorary degree at St Andrews University in St Andrews, Fife, Scotland on September 13, 2013. Former US secretary of state Hillary Clinton made the graduation address during a ceremony in which she was given an honourary degree and the 600th anniversary of the founding of the University was marked. AFP PHOTO / POOL / DANNY LAWSON (Photo credit should read DANNY LAWSON/AFP/Getty Images)

U.K. Prime Minister David Cameron caused controversy last week by calling Britain a "Christian country," but the former Archbishop of Canterbury, Lord Rowan Williams, has a different take on the matter.

Williams told the Sunday Telegraph that Britain is no longer a "nation of believers," and the era of widespread worship is over.

He characterized Britain as a "post-Christian" nation, "in the sense that habitual practice for most of the population is not taken for granted," reports the BBC.

Williams elaborated on his statements by explaining that "the cultural memory is still quite strongly Christian." However, "It's a matter of defining terms. A Christian country as a nation of believers? No. A Christian country in the sense of still being very much saturated by this vision of the world and shaped by it? Yes."

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