BLACK VOICES
12/10/2015 12:58 am ET Updated Dec 10, 2015

#StayMadAbby Is Black Students’ Perfect Response To Justice Scalia

They started the hashtag after he argued that black students do better in "slower-track" schools.
Members of the National Action Network demonstrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Dec. 9, 2015, as the court heard
Cliff Owen/ASSOCIATED PRESS
Members of the National Action Network demonstrate outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Dec. 9, 2015, as the court heard oral arguments in the Fisher v. University of Texas at Austin affirmative action case.

Black students and college grads are rallying against Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia on Twitter after he made some troubling comments about their supposed inability to graduate from universities he said were "too fast."

Scalia's comments came during oral arguments on Wednesday for the affirmative action case Fisher v. University of Texas. The suit, filed by onetime prospective student Abigail Fisher, alleges that she was denied admission to the University of Texas at Austin because she was white, and that other, lesser qualified candidates were admitted due to their race.

The hashtag #StayMadAbby has taken off on Twitter, with hundreds of black graduates tweeting photos of themselves clad in caps and gowns, as well as statistics pointedly noting that black students only account for a small share of the UT Austin student body.

During Wednesday's arguments, Scalia appeared to argue that black students would do better in "slower-track" schools.

"There are those who contend that it does not benefit African-Americans to get them into the University of Texas, where they do not do well," he said.

The justice went on to claim that "most" black scientists "don't come from schools like the University of Texas," but rather from "lesser schools where they do not feel that... they're being pushed ahead in classes that are too fast for them."

Fisher v. University of Texas has split America's highest court over the issue of affirmative action, and many worry the consideration of race in college admissions may soon be illegal.

A decision on the case is expected in June.

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