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08/18/2015 09:26 am ET

The Mashed-Potato Alternative With Way Fewer Calories And Carbs

Don't worry -- it's still full of flavor.

We all love mashed potatoes, but most of us don't love the often unhealthy way they're made. (So. Much. Butter.) To get all the comfort and flavor of mashed potatoes without the fat, registered dietitian Megan Roosevelt suggests swapping that main ingredient with a much more nutritious option: cauliflower. It's low in calories and carbs while being high in fiber, she says, and, yes, it still tastes like the real thing. 

Whipped Cauliflower

Thinkstock

 Ingredients

1 head of cauliflower

10 c. water

1 Tbsp. organic unrefined coconut oil

1/4 c. canned coconut milk

Pinch of sea salt

Pinch of freshly ground pepper

Fresh herbs (like parsley or dill) for garnish, optional

Directions

Pour the water into a large pot and boil over high heat.

Chop the cauliflower into even-sized pieces and transfer to a vegetable steamer over the pot of boiling water. Let the cauliflower steam for about 10 minutes.

Place the steamed cauliflower into a blender. Add coconut milk, coconut oil, sea salt and pepper. Blend on low speed. (If you blend on high speed, the consistency will be more like a smoothie than mashed potatoes.)

To serve, sprinkle with fresh herbs like parsley or dill.

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