UK Election Leads To Hung Parliament With Theresa May's Failure To Reach Majority

06/09/2017 02:37 am ET Updated Jun 09, 2017
Prime Minister Theresa May
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Prime Minister Theresa May

The United Kingdom’s election in 2017 has lead to a hung parliament, with Theresa May’s Conservative Party with only 314 seats, failing to reach the needed 326 seats for a majority.

Theresa May had called a snap election early in order to be able to negotiate Brexit conditions with talks coming up in 11 days. This has massively backfired, as the election resulted in a failure to reach a 326 seat majority for the Conservatives, leading to a chaotic situation of a hung parliament. Many are unsure how this will result for the UK government.

Jeremy Corbyn’s Labour Party has won 261 seats, vastly outperforming all predictions that were previously made, with many criticizing Jeremy Corbyn. There was quite a bit of turnout of young people who voted for the Labour Party.

This has made an extremely poor image of Theresa May, as she had decided to call the election early, but instead it massively backfired and destroyed her image of strength and stability as a leader. Now the United Kingdom has showed that they do not firmly agree with what she wants to do, and now she will have to prove to the people of the United Kingdom that they should support what she wants to do.

Well, what’s next? The Conservatives have the largest party, and they will have to ask the Queen if they can make a new government, but it is likely that either there will be a coalition government formed, or that there will be another election soon. The Conservatives had previously made a coalition government with the Liberal Democrats, who now have 12 seats. A combination of the Conservative Party’s 314 seats and the Liberal Democrats 12 seats would lead to a majority of 326 seats that would allow them to form a government.

However, the Labour Party leader Jeremy Corbyn has called on Theresa May to resign as the UK has shown that they do not overwhelmingly support Theresa May’s agenda.

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