POLITICS
01/21/2017 03:10 pm ET

Woman At D.C. March Disappointed Her Protest Gear From The 1960s Is Relevant Today

“I am really sorry that I am still protesting this stuff."

As protesters across the globe marched in support of women’s rights on Saturday, one woman expressed disbelief that such demonstrations are still necessary in 2017. 

Mary Rivers, who flew from Champaign, Illinois, to walk in the Women’s March on Washington, said she is disappointed that she still has to fight for women’s rights. 

“I am really sorry that I am still protesting this stuff,” she told The Huffington Post’s Alex Berg.

Rivers wore several pins during the march, one of which read “silence is the violence of complicity” and another that showed an equality symbol. 

“That’s from 1960,” she said. “I had to dig it out because it’s relevant again ― and I’m really, really sorry that it’s relevant again.”

Rivers said her biggest issues of concern include keeping the Affordable Care Act intact, fighting climate change and the fact that “a man who likes to tweet has his finger on the nuclear button.” She added that she hopes the march sends an important message to Republican lawmakers whose promises to repeal Obamacare and defund Planned Parenthood would have serious implications for women.

“[Republican Congress members should] look at the number of people who are out here today who are saying we don’t like this and that they realize that they’ve got a constituency, a huge constituency, that they need to be paying attention to,” she said. 

The video above was shot by Mike Caravella, produced by Omar Kasrawi and edited by Terence Krey. 

The video above was shot by Mike Caravella, produced by Omar Kasrawi and edited by Terence Krey. 

HuffPost

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