Wonder Woman Save Us All

Given our times, the citizens of the U.S. could very much use a disciple of truth, justice, and love.
01/20/2017 07:41 pm ET Updated Feb 03, 2017
Wonder Woman #7, Published Dec. 1943, DC Comics

It’s been a terrifically hectic day! The strangely warm winter weather after a series of powerful downpours, and the added announcement that the science community has officially now confirmed that 2016 is the hottest on record, has not helped to alleviate my discomfort. Climate change wouldn’t necessarily be something that I’d be worrying about, except that the newly inaugurated presidential administration considers the entire theory a hoax!

The fact that there is now a man in control of the highest office on the planet who isn’t at all concerned about the future of our long-suffering environment ― except for his own financial gain ― is enough to give me reason to pause and find something to distract me from the headlines, the internet chatter, and the static of it all! It’s no surprise, and also my great fortune, that last Wednesday I, like many comic book fans, visited my local specialty shop to pick up the latest newly published releases. To my delight, as I hit the shelves and picked up the newest issues of my favorite DC and Marvel Comics titles, I was momentarily distracted by all the discord.

Sitting idly and awaiting my adoration was an action figure of none other than one of DC Comics’ most recognizable icons: Wonder Woman, Princess Diana the Amazing Amazon! To be fair, the six-inch representation of the character that I held in my hand was a near-replica of Gal Gadot, the actress who portrayed the heroine in the 2016 summer blockbuster film “Batman v Superman: The Dawn of Justice”. The same actress will be returning to reprise her role twice in two of this year’s most highly anticipated action films, but nonetheless, the idea of Wonder Woman was leaping right out at me and hitting in the face.

Oh, how we could use Wonder Woman just about now! Created in 1941 by William Moulton Marston (the man responsible for creating the lie detector), the fictional super heroine is considered the third part of the principal pantheon of the DC Comics trinity of heroes that include Superman and Batman. Wonder Woman is the benchmark by which all other heroes are measured; she is the representing of truth, justice, and love. Deflecting enemy barrages with her steely wrist bracelets, navigating the skies in her invisible jet, or lassoing her enemies into submission through the use of her magical lasso, it appears we could use Wonder Woman now more than ever!

Entering her 75th Anniversary as a pop icon, imagine the deeper resonance the character would have had had the election turned out differently, especially as many would have gathered in our nation’s capital to herald a candidate who would have made a historic contribution to the overall tapestry of our cultural climate, breaking a glass ceiling as easily as Wonder Woman enters the battlefield. Unfortunately, the outcome of the election has taken us in a drastically different and dangerously uncertain turn ― one demanding that women march on the capital not in celebration but in protest.

Ironically, at a time when Wonder Woman has appeared to apex in her cultural significance, proving an empowering figure of equality, fortitude and compassion, it appears that man is not ready to embrace all that comes with that magnificence. Instead, society has reverted to one of its instincts: capsizing an opportunity to establish for many a sense of providence and prosperity.

So Wonder Woman, perhaps, would serve as an ambassador sent in good faith. When the world appears most in turmoil, she would protect the meek from harm and the disenfranchised from corruption, with her lasso of truth at the ready.

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