Would You Dye Your Christmas Tree?

12/12/2016 03:16 pm ET Updated Dec 12, 2016

For Architectural Digest, by Marissa G. Muller.

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There are few holiday sights more iconic than a Christmas tree dripping in ornaments and lights — but, to some, not all traditions are worth preserving. This year, one of the biggest trends in seasonal decor is colorful Christmas trees — that is, trees that come in shades not found in the forest. Stores across the country are allowing customers to tint their trees hot pink, blue, purple, and even rainbow. At Wyckoff’s Christmas Tree Farm in Belvidere, New Jersey (the closest such retailer to New York City), colorful Christmas trees have already sold out, according to the website.

“Customers bought trees in every color, including a black tree for a Goth couple, a red/gold tree for 49ers fans, and a blue-and-pink tree for an artist!” wrote one Instagram user.

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Of course, decorating could be a challenge if you eschew traditional tastes. We prefer a neutral, natural background for our holiday halls, which means a classic verdant pine. Though one benefit of the dyed version is that it tends to last longer.

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