THE BLOG
08/08/2016 12:21 pm ET Updated Aug 02, 2017

Again, a Republican U.S. Senate Candidate Backpedals on Abortion

If you look at the Colorado Right to Life website, you'll see that Colorado U.S. Senate candidate Darryl Glenn is labled "pro-life."

If you're Colorado Right to Life, you're opposed to all abortion, even for rape and incest. No exceptions. No abortion. Never. And you're opposed to some forms of birth control, like some intrauterine devices (IUDs).

The group determined that Glenn is "pro-life" based on his answers to questions about seven "pro-life issues," revealing his position "through specific language with no weasel-room."

Colorado Right to Life states:

No candidate who supports abortion for any reason is "pro-life." Regardless of what they may say, any truly pro-life citizen/candidate believes that government has an obligation to protect all human life from conception forward, and therefore pledge to oppose all abortion (with the understanding that a doctor may take action to save a woman's life while also trying to save the baby's life, even if the baby's survival is doubtful due to other factors) - every innocent human being has an inalienable Right to Life at every age or stage of development.

But as the Durango Herald's Peter Marcus reports today, Glenn appears to have described his abortion stance differently to different audiences.

Marcus quotes Glenn in an appearance on "Devil's Advocate," a television show sponsored by the conservative Independence Institute.

Glenn said: "As a person who has two adult daughters, I put myself in that situation. And I want to make sure that when we're talking about health care, you want to make sure that women have the ability and access to health care, so that they understand all the different options that are out there. And at some point in time, maybe they might have to make that decision. But that is a personal decision that they have to make between them and... God."

Marcus' report included a reaction to the Caldara interview from Colorado Right to Life:

"I'm willing to say on behalf of our organization that his comments were not nearly as strong as we would hope," said Susan Sutherland, vice president of Colorado Right to Life. "He was just trying to play a little bit of political maneuvering there."

Republican U.S. Sen. Cory Gardner ran into a similar situation in 2014 when he defeated incumbent Democrat Mark Udall. To defeat Udall, Gardner walked more to the middle on the abortion issue, attempting to distance himself from personhood.

Glenn proudly leaned to the right during the primary, which helped propel the relatively unknown El Paso County commissioner to success in a crowded GOP field.

But Glenn wouldn't talk to Marcus. And The Denver Post's John Frank has been trying to talk to Glenn about his abortion stance for weeks, with no luck.

Before Gardner sprt pf backtracked on his abortion stance, there was 2010 Republican U.S. Senate candidate Ken Buck, who, after the GOP primary, oops, took back his support for a personhood abortion ban  because, he said at the time, he didn't understand the proposed amendment.

Like Buck, U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman was cozy with the poor folks at Colorado Right to Life, before he jumped ship and took back his personhood support a couple years ago--though he's never offered up much detail on why and how his position evolved on the issue.

I woudn't be feeling very good if I were in the shoes of Colorado Right to Life, but we all agree that it's better to have journalists expose the buckpedaling than leaving it buried in candidate questionnaires few people bother to read.