THE BLOG
08/31/2015 12:34 pm ET Updated Aug 31, 2016

The Donald Again Sounds Like Mike Coffman

The Donald, whose trick to political success is never playing defense, continued his offensive stance (pun intended) last week, telling Bloomberg TV that congressional Republicans should fight to stop an increase in the debt limit.

And in doing so, The Donald sounded almost exactly like ... Aurora Congressman Mike Coffman.

You may recall that the last time Republicans fought an increase in the debt limit, the economy teetered and America's credit rating was actually factually downgraded by Standard and Poor's for the first time, mostly because of the political sparring, not the state of our economy.

But no mention of these little problems by Trump and Coffman:

First, The Donald on TV:

Presidential candidate Donald Trump on Wednesday said he thought it was "worth the fight" for congressional Republicans to threaten not to raise the U.S. debt limit as a way to pressure the Obama administration to agree to spending cuts.

"I would say that it's worth the fight," Trump said on Bloomberg TV. "Honestly there is so much fat in Washington that if you had the right people in there you could cut it."

Next Coffman in 2013, as reported by Fox 31's Denver's Eli Stokols at the time:

But Republicans, having agreed to put off decisions about spending cuts, now view the looming debt ceiling as leverage -- and they're promising to use it....

Coffman: "I don't think going over the fiscal cliff would have been a huge deal. Temporarily, the markets would have been aggravated until the next Congress could have passed new tax cuts and ironed things out.

"But the real big deal is what's upon us and going past the debt limit. I have to see a way out of this, real spending cuts, before I vote to raise the debt limit."

Sounds a lot like Trump, doesn't he?

As I reported before, the two sound alike on immigration (here and here) as well.

I know reporters don't have time to hook every national political development to our humble locale. But they should give it their best shot, because the stakes are so high.

Republicans and Democrats increased the debt limit over 100 times (Bush and Reagan did it) until 2011, when disaster struck.

Trump gives us a chance to air the issue out again, in advance of the crisis and in front of the public.