How To Set Goals You'll Actually Keep In The New Year

12/06/2015 08:23 am ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

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The year is drawing to a close and in between the Sees candy and holiday shopping, some of us are furtively mulling over the year ahead. Which naturally brings up the year behind. How's the rear view for you?

A Job Well Done!

Let me guess, you have your 2015 Goals all checked off, each and every one, the individual tasks required for the completion of each goal lined through with the corresponding finish date.

You accomplished this by clearly writing down each and every goal throughout the year, defining the 'How' and 'Why' of each goal, checking to make sure they were R.E.A.L. for you and then reviewing that list every single day.

Then, every 90 days you reviewed your Master Goal List, creating the next series of goals and setting to work on the same process.

Go you!

Thanks to your dedication and persistence, the year is drawing to a close and you are now living the life of your dreams. Woo Hoo!

Or Not . . .

Wait, what? That's not your story? You didn't exactly do all those nifty little goal setting thingies?

Rats.

Aw well, join the crowd. Turns out, the majority of us don't. We think about goals, and that's called wishing; we talk about goals, and that's usually called whining; but rarely do we do what it takes to make them happen.

Here's how we stack up as goal setters:

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  • 80 percent never even think about goals
  • 16 percent think about goals, but never write them down
  • 3 percent write them down, but don't review them regularly, if ever
  • 1 percent write them down and review them regularly. These are the high-achieving, badass winners of the group.

Can you find yourself in the mix? I've been all over the map on this one. I do know when I've been in the 1 percent, my goals unfolded for me in an easy, almost magical way.

A New Leaf

If we know that goal setting is the easiest, most effective way to attain the life we want, why don't we do it?

I'm so glad you asked.

Research shows that there are three primary factors:

1. Fear
Fear of change, fear of failure, fear of the unknown. Fear can cripple us into inaction, keeping us right where we're at.

2. Laziness
Goals require energy. You need to turn off the TV. Put down the game on your phone. Make changes and do things differently.

3. Lack of clarity
Many people aren't sure who they really are and what they really want. How do you set a goal if you don't know where you're going?

Take a few minutes to look over each of those obstacles. Do you need to break down some barriers before you get started?

2016 Is Looming . . .

If 2015 wasn't a stellar year for you in the goal-setting department, there's an entire fresh new year coming right around the corner. What will you do with it?

Will the year be filled with 'Wishing and Whining' or 'Accomplishing and Enjoying'?

It's up to you.

How do you want the year end of 2016 to feel? What do you want to be doing, having, living?

Goal setting is free, easy and one of the most effective actions you can take to make lasting changes in your life. Done properly, goal setting is truly fun and exciting, something you'll look forward to. Let's kick some ass in 2016.

Kimberly Montgomery is the creator of the Choices Notebook and blogger at Fifty Jewels.com, where she encourages people to use their powers for good. Hop on over there to join in on her Free Goal Setting Workshop this month.

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