THE BLOG
07/12/2016 06:28 pm ET Updated Jul 13, 2017

New Tech in Tennessee That Could Supercharge Education

The technologies of tomorrow are making headway into Tennessee classrooms as one of the largest Digital Resources Library was announced today in Nashville, Tennessee. It took nearly eighteen months to complete the library, which brought fifty-eight Tennessee teachers together, who curated digital learning resources for high school courses that are aligned to state standards. While Texas and a handful of other states have also created digital libraries, this is one of the largest digital libraries which combined the efforts of numerous organizations including the Tennessee School Boards Association (TSBA), Tennessee Organization of School Superintendents (TOSS), Tennessee Association of Supervision and Curriculum Development (TASCD), and the Tennessee Educational Technology Association (TETA).

"We are very excited about the launch of the digital library and believe it will be a tremendous resource for our educators and students," said TSBA Executive Director Dr. Tammy Grissom.

Funded by the American Public Education Foundation and Pickler Companies, the Tennessee Digital Resources Library was created to help school districts use and share open educational resources to help teachers deliver content in the classrooms. Many top educators see the process of technology coming into the classroom as "inevitable" which is why Tennessee took such a strong position in embracing new technologies and creating partnerships with Apple, Inc., which provided technical support to all fifty-eight teachers. In August 2015, teachers began curating digital learning materials for the following fourteen high school courses: Algebra I and II; Biology; Chemistry; Economics; English I, II, III and IV; Geometry; Government; Physical Science; U.S. and World History.

"Tennessee has been a true reform leader in the post-common core world. The state has established Tennessee-specific standards. They are developing curriculum around these high standards, and with the TDRL, we have the opportunity to bridge the digital divide and create greater educational opportunity for all students," said Foundation president David A. Pickler, J.D, founder and president of Pickler Companies. The Foundation and Pickler Companies provided all fifty-eight teachers supporting the project with iPad Air 2s and stipends ranging from $500 to $1000 (team leaders).

While many are hoping technology will save time and offer personalized and adaptive delivery of curricula, it is also a potential savings for school districts. The curated digital materials replace costly textbooks that often are obsolete before ever reaching students. Additionally, at a time of significant national concern with the price of higher education, there is also hope that innovative technology can better prepare students for tech-driven workplaces. Early supporters include Senator Jim Tracy (R-Shelbyville) and Rep. John Forgety (R-Athens), with Tracy noting that to accomplish TDRL "took leadership," and that these digital resources "will improve the quality of education across the spectrum in Tennessee."
The Tennessee School Boards Association website, www.tsba.net (click TDRL), houses the materials, which are free to all teachers.