THE BLOG
02/18/2014 05:09 pm ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

At the Shelter: Can Sensory Input Influence Adoptions?

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I'm one of those people whose mind always seems to translate things into how they relate to dogs. The other morning was no exception. I came across an article stating that researchers have discovered what they call the "temperature-premium" effect. According to the study, published in the Journal of Consumer Psychology, a series of five field and lab studies were used to measure and manipulate physical warmth in conjunction with shoppers' assessments of perceived value of products. The findings suggest that "exposure to physical warmth activates the concept of emotional warmth." This study follows others that found a relationship between positive feelings and reduced distance from the subject, and suggests that increased temperatures also reduce people's perceived distance from the subject.

Now, I'm not suggesting that we "trick" anyone into feeling like they should adopt a dog; the last thing anyone wants is adopter's remorse and a return. But there's nothing wrong with making people feel as comfortable and receptive as possible when meeting their potential new best friend. In regard to the temperature premium effect, the meet and greet rooms in shelters and rescues comes to mind. In the study, the target temperature was a few degrees above 72. That's not a temperature that would be uncomfortable to most dogs, and it might relax people. If you run an adoption facility, wouldn't it be worthwhile to conduct an unofficial "study" to see whether it helps? I wonder too whether we could extrapolate from the study that a higher temperature in the kennel buildings would make people feel closer to the subjects in distance, which might in turn reduce emotional distance.

We also know that music can help dogs to relax in shelter type environments, thanks to studies that have been done with classical music as well as music that is psycho-acoustically designed to help dogs relax, such as the Through a Dog's Ear series. And, we know that certain types of music are more likely to make humans relax. As a general rule, classical music is more relaxing than, say, heavy metal music--unless, of course, you're a sixteen-year-old boy. So why not pump relaxing music into the kennels? It could relax the dogs, in turn making them more adoptable, and calm the people, putting them more at ease and hopefully in a more receptive state.

There are also other senses that can be engaged to help dogs and people to relax. Smell is a dog's primary sense. DAP--Dog Appeasing Pheromone--is a product that mimics the pheromones emitted by a lactating female dog. Turns out they're comforting not only to puppies, but to adults as well. (There is some debate about whether this product is effective; to me, it falls into the can't-hurt-might-help category, and I have heard plenty of anecdotal evidence where it did work.) Using DAP in kennels could well help dogs to relax. But what about humans who don't have the vomero-nasal organ dogs have to detect those pheromones? Well, there's aromatherapy. What about some nice, relaxing lavender?

You get the idea. We all want to stay in environments that we enjoy longer than ones in which we're uncomfortable. (Case in point: I have walked out of more mall stores that were playing obnoxious music than I can count.) If we're physically comfortable and feeling pleasantly relaxed, we're a lot more likely to be in a receptive state mentally and emotionally. Again, we're certainly aren't aiming to "trick" anyone into adoptions. But isn't it worth our while to make our shelter environments as pleasant as possible, and do everything we can to help people be more open to considering the dogs?

Nicole Wilde is a canine behavior specialist and author. Visit her website www.nicolewilde.com.

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