THE BLOG
08/28/2015 10:01 am ET Updated Dec 06, 2017

It's National Breastfeeding Month, and for the First Time, I'm Not Sad or Angry

When I nearly died from complications after delivering our twins, I grieved one thing possibly more than any other: the loss of my ability to breastfeed my babies.

Breastfeeding was just something I knew that I would do. It was really important to me, and in our first few days in the hospital, I was breastfeeding Etta and pumping to send milk to Claire in the NICU at Children's Hospital. I remember the agony of my possessed hospital pump that would randomly turn itself to high and threaten to rip my poor nipples right off. I remember the ritual of Jon cleaning all the various parts in the hospital room sink so we could get ready to do it all over again all too soon. And I remember the pride I felt in sending those little 2-ounce bottles of "liquid gold" to my girl recovering from surgery to close her myelomeningocele (the most severe type of spina bifida), feeling comfort that if I couldn't be there holding her, at least she was getting a little bit of me to strengthen and nourish her. It was so important to me, that when I was intubated and unconscious in the ICU myself, my husband had a lactation consultant bring the pump up, because he just knew I'd be very mad if I woke up and discovered they had let my precious milk dry up.

Unfortunately, when I woke up, they told me that drying up was exactly what I would have to do, because the medicines I needed to help my heart were not safe for nursing moms, and there were no safer alternatives. I had to stop breastfeeding so my heart wouldn't stop beating.

From where I sit now, with happy, healthy three-year-olds, this seems like an obvious choice -- the clear, right thing for my health. But at the time it felt rather devastating, because I believed I'd be settling for "second best" for my babies. Oh, how I cried. I remember noticing that even my damn formula can said "breast is best" on it and SOBBING. And for a while, I felt sad or defensive every time breastfeeding came up. Sad because I didn't get to do something that was important to me. Defensive because I felt like so many people essentially wanted to see a doctor's note to justify our "choice." "Breast is best" became a trigger for rage -- oh yeah? Let me show you how bonded I am to these bottle-fed babies! Let me tell you about immune systems and antibodies when these formula-fed kiddos haven't had a single ear infection in over 3 years of life!

But now, 3 years in, it's amazing to realize how all of that has just kind of fallen away. My kids eat food now. They drink mostly water, and sometimes whole cow milk. No one really asks if they were breast- or bottle-fed. No one really questions our bond, or their intelligence, or their health. They're just happy, healthy kids, and what seemed SO IMPORTANT and SO DEVASTATING to me back in that hospital room, my breasts and my heart aching for what I could no longer give to my babies, well, it seems so far away and so small now.

Today, I don't feel a twinge of pain or sadness or loss when I see my friends nursing their babies. Today, I can stand alongside other parents and say that our culture needs to do a whole lot more to support nursing parents. And today I also feel a whole lot of compassion for those of us who feel a little too aware during Breastfeeding Awareness Month, too aware of what we perceive as our failings or shortcomings, or too aware of what we perceive as judgment from others, or too aware of loss and pain. To you who are still in that place, I am writing this to say: It gets better. Your babies will thrive not because of what they are drinking, but because of your great love. They will be bonded to you not because of your breasts but because of your hearts. They will be healthy because of your care, not because of antibodies in their milk. They will grow, and they will thrive, and this big deal will shrink and shrink and disappear in the rearview. I promise. I've finally made it there.

This post first appeared on The Adventures of Ernie Bufflo.

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