THE BLOG
09/15/2014 08:21 am ET Updated Nov 15, 2014

8 Tips for Dealing With Mental Health Stigma in Today's Society

Do you struggle with your mental health and have a difficult time in getting your friends and family to be understanding? In some cases your friends and relatives might give you a hard time regarding your mental health struggles. Here eight suggestions on how to deal with mental health stigma from your peers.

1. Talk To A Counselor: The most important thing that you need to do is to talk to a counselor about your mental health problems. Seeking professional help will help you to overcome your current issues. In addition, a counselor will be able to give you additional advice on how to deal with your friends and coworkers.

2. Don't Argue With Others: It is important that you do not get into arguments with those who are giving you a hard time. Your number one priority is to overcome your mental health issues. It is not your job to convince people that you are right and they are wrong. Your health is more important than what other people may think.

3. Watch Who You Hang Out With: It is important to surround yourself with positive people. Try to keep your distance from those people who are giving you a difficult time. Remember your goal is to remain positive and hopeful. Do not let the negative people in your life bring you down.

4. You Are Not Alone: It can be very frustrating to deal with your mental health issues when your friends and relatives are on your case. Remember, you are not alone. There are millions of people around the world who struggle with their fears, anxieties, depression, and stresses. The key is to find those people who can relate to you through various support groups in your area.

5. Stand Your Ground: It is important to stand your ground when dealing with family members and coworkers who are giving you a hard time. Explain your situation and your feelings to the people in your life, however don't let them hassle you. Again, your No. 1 priority is to get better and not to please everyone that you hang out with.

6. Join A Support Group: There are many mental health support groups in your area. Many hospitals, churches, and counselors in your area will be able to provide you with a list of groups. These support groups will be supportive of your situation and give you additional advice regarding your problems. Joining a support group is very important in a person's recovery and ability to find people who can relate to you.

7. Learn To Take It One Day At A Time: Instead of worrying about how you will get through the rest of the week or coming month, try to focus on today. Each day can provide us with different opportunities to learn new things and that includes learning how to deal with your problems. When the time comes, hopefully you will have learned the skills to deal with your situation.

8. Don't Give Up: Never give up regardless of your situation. The answers to your problems are out there; however, you must find those answers. You will not get better if you sit on the couch and don't make an effort to get better. You need to know that you will eventually get better. Do not lose hope even during the worse of times. You problems will not last forever, and things do eventually change for the better.

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Need help? In the U.S., call 1-800-273-8255 for the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline.