THE BLOG
06/25/2014 11:20 am ET Updated Aug 25, 2014

The Challenges of Finding Work in Today's Cuba

Eugenia lost her job of 30 years in an office of the Ministry of Transport. She was left "available," according to the declaration of her bosses, before they offered her a job as a bricklayer. Reluctant to lay bricks and mix mortar, she launched herself on the private market to see what she could find. Her possibilities were few. She doesn't speak any other languages, she's never touched a computer, and she doesn't have the "good looks" of youth.

A friend signed her up on a digital site to look for work. "We don't accept people with dentures," said the first interviewer when she went for a job cleaning a house rented to foreigners. The owner of the place wanted "a clean woman who doesn't talk very much, doesn't smoke and looks strong." She hired someone else and Eugenia decided to invest in her physique.

She dyed her hair, bought new shoes, and made the rounds of several cafes and restaurants in Central Havana. Over 50, almost all the places responded the same, "we already have people in the kitchen and you won't do for a waitress." Eugenia noticed that behind the bars or waiting tables in the new privately run places there are almost always young thin women with prominent busts.

"You are from Havana, right?" she was asked at a place where they contracted with people to wash and iron. Eugenia was born in Holguin and spent nearly her entire life in the Cuban capital, but the owner of the laundry said she wouldn't do. "We want Havana people, so there will be no problems with relatives who come and want to stay in the house."

A neighbor told her about another possibility, caring for an old man. He was retired military and could barely get around in a wheel chair. "You can't say anything bad about the Revolution in front of him," warned the children of the old man, who had to feed him, change his clothes and read him the Granma newspaper. In the end, Eugenia also failed to get that job.

For a few days she managed to care for a child, but it was only a week because, "if you can't sing and don't know any children's games my son gets bored," the mother of the little boy told her. Eugenia only knows how to fill out forms, attach stamps, and nod her head affirmatively during the long meetings that were held at her company. She can't compete in today's job market.

Yesterday she heard about a job scrubbing in a private restaurant. "You can't leave the kitchen during work hours," the cook told her. "It's better if the customers don't see you," he repeated, before confirming that she was "on a trial basis."

Click here for selected English Translations from Yoani Sanchez's newly launched newspaper, 14ymedio.