TECHNOLOGY

WikiLeaks RETURNS: Website Takes New Approach After Being Forced Offline

12/03/2010 12:00 am ET | Updated May 25, 2011

WikiLeaks has returned roughly six hours after it was forced offline, but it's got a new address. The website's primary host in the United States pulled the plug after "mass attacks," according to WikiLeaks. Now the organization appears to be back online as WikiLeaks.ch instead of WikiLeaks.org.

They made the announcement via Twitter, saying "WikiLeaks moves to Switzerland."

Before the incident on Thursday night, WikiLeaks was booted from Amazon servers on Dec. 1, causing a brief outage, and tonight it went down again. The site had migrated to Swedish servers, per the AP.

The WikiLeaks Twitter account (@WikiLeaks) initially took a while to respond to the outage, but finally spoke up, stating "WikiLeaks,org domain killed by US everydns.net after claimed mass attacks."

The DNS outage meant that the Wikileaks.org domain name was down worldwide.

The Pentagon said Wednesday it could take down WikiLeaks if it wanted to, but to that point had decided against it. There have been reports that Russia is interested in shutting the site down.

This is a developing story. Follow the latest WikiLeaks updates below.

12/20/2010 6:42 PM EST

Yemen Left Nuclear Material Unguarded

According to a recently released cable, a facility in Yemen holding nuclear material was left unsecured after its one guard was removed and a security camera broke, according to the AP. The cable quoted one official as saying, "Very little now stands between the bad guys and Yemen's nuclear material."

Assange was asked about the decision to release cables that identified sites vulnerable to terrorist attacks when Katie Couric interviewed him on Friday. Assange told her:

We are an organization that attempts to promote human rights by revealing abuses that are concealed. So, of course we never want to be in a position where through our releases we are actually causing harm to indivduals, or at least more harm than the good we are causing.

12/20/2010 6:27 PM EST

Last Week In WikiLeaks

In case you missed any WikiLeaks cable highlights last week, here's a quick guide to get you up to speed. It covers Tom Cruise on Scientology, Castro on Obama and everything in between.

12/17/2010 12:04 PM EST

Assange Opens Up After Gaining Freedom

The Today show interviewed WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange on Friday after his release from prison on bail Thursday afternoon. During the interview, he described his recent court appearances as "not the beginning of the end, rather it is merely the end of the beginning."

Assange confirmed that he has heard there will be espionage charges filed against him in the U.S., and denied knowing Bradley Manning, the U.S. Army intelligence analyst accused of providing WikiLeaks with information. The U.S. is allegedly putting together a case against Assange on conspiracy charges.

You can watch the entire interview here.

12/16/2010 6:09 PM EST

Assange Reportedly Bracing For U.S. Indictment

Assange is reportedly preparing himself for a U.S. indictment on espionage charges. Reports Sky News:

Speaking upon arrival at the Suffolk country mansion where he was bailed to by the High Court, he said the American legal action "had yet to be confirmed" but was "very serious".

Sky also quotes Assange as saying, "We have heard today from one of my US lawyers that there may be a US indictment for espionage for me coming from a secret grand jury investigation."

The New York Times reported yesterday that the U.S. is trying to build a conspiracy case against Assange, focusing on proving that he "encouraged or even helped" Bradley Manning with the leak.

12/16/2010 6:03 PM EST

Where Is Julian Assange Spending Christmas?

The Independent has an interesting article by Vaughan Smith, the man sheltering Assange after his release. Smith describes how he came to the decision to open what is being called his "British country mansion" to the beleaguered WikiLeaks founder. Writes Smith about:

They made him out to be the internet’s Bin Laden. The likeness might be poor, but that was OK because the colours were familiar and bright. Now the focus is on Julian’s court fight, instead of on the opaque political system that his leaks have exposed. The charges that Julian faces have already been dropped once, from a Swedish court that even Glenn Beck, the incendiary US Fox News TV host, rubbishes.

Julian is different to most of us. He is clever and obsessive but also funny and self-deprecating. But he has started something seismic but inevitable, a consequence of modern communications that cannot be stopped.

You can read Smith's entire piece here.

12/16/2010 4:24 PM EST

What Will Assange Do Next?

Now that he's free, what will the WikiLeaks founder do next? Cast your vote for Assange's next move here.

12/16/2010 2:32 PM EST

Assange's Statement Outside Court

Reuters is reporting the text of Assange's speech outside the court. It reads in part:

During my time in solitary confinement in the bottom of a Victorian prison I had time to reflect on the conditions of those people around the world also in solitary confinement, also on remand, in conditions that are more difficult than those faced by me. Those people also need your attention and support.

And with that I hope to continue my work and continue to protest my innocence in this matter and to reveal, as we get it, which we have not yet, the evidence from these allegations. Thank you.

You can listen to Assange speaking on a live audio recording here.

12/16/2010 1:16 PM EST

Assange Speaks Outside Court

Assange has emerged from court and is speaking. According to Sky News, he declared, "It's great to smell the fresh air of London again."

12/16/2010 12:53 PM EST

Assange Walks Free

Julian Assange has just been released, the Guardian is reporting.

12/16/2010 12:09 PM EST

Assange's 'Paperwork Complete'

ABC is reporting that Assange's paperwork the only possible holdup to his release, is complete. @jimsciuttoABC tweeted:

We're told Assange's paperwork is complete and going to court clerk now

More:

Wikileaks
Suggest a correction