CHICAGO

Two Lawsuits Against Go Bananas Theme Park Over Toddler Jayson Dansby's Death

04/20/2011 10:56 pm ET | Updated Jun 20, 2011

The parents of a toddler who died at a suburban Chicago theme park filed suit Tuesday against the park, claiming that negligence led to the child's fatal accident.

Also suing the Go Bananas indoor amusement park in Norridge, Illinois -- apparently unrelated to the parents' suit -- is Marion Grant, a woman who came to the aid of 3-year-old Jayson Dansby after he fell from the Python Pit roller coaster to his death.

The child was at the park with his family for a weekend outing on April 2, when he slipped out of the ride's safety restraint, and fell to the ground. According to the Chicago Tribune, an attorney for the boy's parents is arguing that the ride would not stop when the operator saw Jayson in trouble and attempted to halt it.

"The parents ... who were there, saw that little Jayson was standing up in the ride and began screaming to the operator to stop the ride," attorney Patrick Salvi said at a press conference. "By her (the operator's) own statement to police, it would not stop."

Jason and Lisa Dansby have filed a wrongful death suit against the park, seeking undisclosed damages, WGN reports.

Go Bananas did not comment on the suit, but it did release a statement following the incident claiming that "[n]o public official has found any incident of human error or mechanical failure connected with this matter."

Meanwhile, Marion Grant is suing for emotional distress following the same accident. Grant appears to be unrelated to the boy, but was standing near where he died at the time of the accident, and witnessed his injuries, the sight of which allegedly caused her emotional anxiety and distress, the Chicago Sun-Times reports.

She, too, claims the ride didn't have an emergency stop, and argues that it was operated too fast and did not always have an attendant present, according to CBS.

Go Bananas reopened shortly after Dansby's death, though the Python Pit ride was dismantled and blocked off to the public.

More:

Illinois
Suggest a correction