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Jonathan Stich, Restaurant Delivery Farmer: A Week In The Life (Food Informants)

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FOOD INFORMANTS FARMER
Jonathan Stich

Food Informants is a week-in-the-life series profiling fascinating people in the food world. We hope it will give you a first-hand look at the many different corners of the food industry. Know someone who would make a great Food Informant? Tell us why.

Jonathan Stich, 29, is a third generation farmer from Burlington, Wisconsin. He grew weary of the corporate world, went traveling and decided to become a farmer. After reading about how heirloom tomato grower Tim Stark in Pennsylvania sells his products to New York restaurants, Stich made the decision to spend a night in restaurants in Milwaukee and Chicago asking if they'd be interesting in buying local produce.

In the summer of 2010, Anthony Martin, who had just taken over for Rick Tramonto at Chicago's TRU, was his first customer. In 2011, after bugging Dave Beran (then of Alinea, now the chef of Next restaurant) through Facebook all winter, Beran invited Stich to bring him some samples of micro greens. Stich knew Alinea was important in the Chicago restaurant scene, but didn't know who Grant Achatz was. Dave connected Stich to Matt Chasseur (sous chef at Alinea), who placed his first order for pea tendrils, and explained a centerpiece project he was working on. He asked Stich if there were any varieties of a cherry tomato plant that would fit on a table, so the diner could pluck the them as they ate. Stich decided to impress him the next week by bringing in grafted cherry tomato plants -- three different fruit-bearing tomato plants that are cut and grafted together into one stem. It would give the diner the illusion that one plant could produce three different fruits. While Stich was standing at the pass in the Alinea kitchen examining his creations, someone tapped his elbow. When he looked up, Chasseur was standing there with Grant Achatz. He explained the concept and for his ace card he showed them a bucket filled with five pounds of large blonde morels. Between Alinea, Aviary and Next, they have placed an order every week since.

Along with those Chicago restaurants, Stich also supplies TRU, Le Reve, Cafe at the Plaza and Honeypie Cafe.

Read Jonathan Stich's diary below to learn about the life of a farmer and find out how he satisfies the demands of some of the country's top restaurants.

Monday, August 29
6:42am: Wake up. Respond to email from Dave Beran of Next Restaurant confirming Thursday delivery of micro basil, micro mustard, heirloom tomatoes, corn and mint; the same order he's received every week since July. I'm going to add samples of fall products to the order.
7:42am-8:20am: Arrive at greenhouse, water micros. Starting to take pictures of products for Facebook page concept developing for my as-yet-unnamed business.
9:47am: Walk to greenhouse #1 to check on nasturtium flowers I was asked to grow samples of. They may be used on a Next menu or a beef dish the chef is working on at Alinea. The seeds have been planted in flats of 50, but not all sprouted, possibly due to overwatering. Plants will be delivered live in the flat, to be cut fresh for platting.
10:30am: Crossing into oak forest adjacent to property where I grown heirloom tomatoes and herbs. Have decided to invest a few days this week into mapping out areas of woods I think will be strong for wild maitake mushroom which starts in full swing early to mid-September. Going to check trees for mycelium growth and early matured mushroom.
11:38am: Decide to head deeper into woods than initially planned and phone has started beeping from low battery... could be the start of a horror film.
11:49am: BINGO! First fully mature wild maitake mushroom of the season. Using last of phone battery to call Le Reve restaurant in Wauwatosa, WI trying to find a buyer. Leave voicemail for chef Gil to call me back. Not far from maitake find, I spot few pounds of sulfer shelf or chicken of the wood mushrooms. Very fresh product, another great find.
12:15pm: Halting search and headed back for now. Starving, dehydrated and need to send out a slew of email this afternoon.
1:00pm: Emails to Matt Chasseur (Alinea) and Craig Schoettler (Aviary) on product availability for this week.
1:25pm: Email Anthony Martin at TRU reads: "Yo, anything you specifically don't want this week?" We work well together and at this point he places no weekly order of his selection, just some basic request and the rest I fill in with what's seasonal and fits his visual and flavor profiles. Occasionally I'll text him basic questions if I find a new product that might fit him.
2:04pm: Chef Gil at Le Reve calls to confirm an order for the maitake and adds Italian basil and wax beans to his order.
2:11pm: Call from Arthur Ircink, Producer of a local PBS program Wisconsin Foodie. Called to discuss plans for filming the final segment of a profile the show started doing on me back in early July. Agree on shooting all day Friday.
2:33pm: Phone call with Karen Bell, consulting chef for restaurant Cafe at the Plaza in Milwaukee. Discuss her participation in the wrap shoot for WI Foodie and work out details for casual dinner that will be filmed as part of my profile segment.
3pm: Work in field caring for herbs and heirloom tomatoes.
6:55pm: Deliver wild maitake and sulfur shelf mushroom I found earlier, along with 3lbs fresh cut basil to Le Reve. Sit down for dinner at bar area, order Gruyere Ravioli with herb pesto and pea tendrils.
7:02pm: Chef Gil Petrovic sends out small plate of ravioli stuffed with pheasant and smoked mozzarella, in tomato confit, topped with basil blossoms, on the house. Completely rad flavor balance with the sweet basil blossoms and acidic confit. Badass plating, very summer. Gruyere ravioli arrives... Really delicious, really green, very spring with tendrils and English peas... Only issue I see is that it’s August 29th. Chef Gil sends out French horn mushroom atop piquillo pepper gelee inspired by his stage at Alinea. Cool, very cool. Dessert: citron tart pastry, my favorite.

2011-09-06-Screenshot20110906at5.51.20PM.png

Tuesday, August 30
8:25am: Back into the woods for more search. Cloudy, cool and not many mosquitos.
12:27pm: Back at my car to go for lunch. Instead of heading all the way back to town, I decide to grab some crab apples from a tree, few heirlooms from garden and some basil for seasoning.
1pm - 4pm: More field work.
6:39pm: Decide to head to Milwaukee to grab a late dinner.
7:41pm: Arrive at Honeypie Cafe, another regular customer of mine.
7:48pm: Beermosa... smooth beer meets mellow orange citrus. Wasn’t spun in a centrifuge nor does it contain encapsulations, but really stinking awesome.
7:57pm: Dinner - Chicken and biscuit pie... which is a healthy portion of gooey gooey goodness. Finish up with peach pie and ice cream... guess who supplied the peaches?

2011-09-06-Screenshot20110906at5.57.26PM.png

Wednesday, August 30
7:00am: Up and out the door for a quick check of my greenhouse plants, then back to woods for more.
9:50am: Returned to Greenhouse to seed micro greens and pea tendrils for next weeks deliveries.
11:00am: Call to Dad to make sure he has my order for Michigan peaches. He drives a box truck over there weekly to procure seasonal items like peaches and blueberries. He’s been working with fellow farmers over there for 50 years and it’s a great partnership.
11:15am: Call from Lynn at Yuppie Hill Poultry. She gives me an update on her hens' egg production this week, and progress on her new facility expansion. Place an order for Next.
1:43pm: Find dried up chanterelle mushroom. I’ve never hunted them before, but next year I’ll know where to start looking.
3pm-5pm: Field work, mobile emails and phone calls. Early night, huge push tomorrow.

Thursday, September 1
5:45am: Harvest and sort out 20 pounds heirloom tomatoes for Next.
6:20am: Harvest herbs: spearmint, chocolate mint, columnar basil, large leaf Italian basil and rosemary for Aviary, Next and Tru.
7:00am: Water micros, and carry them outside to place into black plastic stackable lugs. Begin loading lugs into car.
9:15am: Drive to Yuppie Hill Poultry to pick up egg order for Next. Lynn gives me a tour of the new barn. I watch Next’s eggs come up a small conveyer belt from the hen house, and Lynn washes, shorts and packages the eggs for delivery.

2011-09-07-Screenshot20110907at2.00.27PM.png

10:10am: Arrive at Geneva Lakes Produce (farm partners) to pick up the season's first harvest of winter squash for Alinea. Also buy muskmelon, corn and cherry tomatoes for Next, Aviary and TRU.
11:20am: Arrive at Haf’s Orchard to pick up the season's first Zestar apple harvest for Alinea and TRU. Talk to Richard about tomorrow's filming at the orchard with WI Foodie tomorrow.
12:35pm: Leave Wisconsin en route to Lincoln Park.
2:15pm: At Alinea for first stop. It’s about 97 degrees in Chicago, humid and no breeze. Feels as hot in the Alinea kitchen, everyone is sweating and it’s obviously crunch time in here. I know the minute I see Chasseur's face I’ll need to come back later for delivery. A quick conference confirms.
2:45pm: At Next. Bring product downstairs into lower kitchen as chef Graves checks everything in. Head up to speak with Beran, then across to Aviary to find Schoettler already cutting his micros at the pass.

2011-09-07-Screenshot20110907at2.03.37PM.png

3:45pm: Back at Alinea... Chasseur grabs A.M. manager chef Jose-Louis and we begin unpacking lugs full of micro greens and winter squash from the back of my Hyundai wagon. Once everything is unloaded and checked, Chasseur explains a new concept involving apples as he gazes at the Zestar I’ve brought him.
4:30pm: TRU. Offload the last of the produce deliveries. Sit down to eat family dinner with staff, but decide to grab M-Burger instead of the eggs and potatoes that have been prepared.

Friday, September 2
6:30am: Arrive at greenhouse to begin prep for today's Milwaukee deliveries and Wisconsin Foodie wrap shoot.
8:15am: More heirloom harvest.
10:45am: Show's producer and cameraman, along with the show’s host, Kyle Cherek, arrive.
11:00am: Filming begins. Host Kyle approaches me for a tour and asks me questions about the restaurants I supply and what deliveries he’ll be accompanying me on this afternoon.
11:25am: With the initial interview now complete, I offer to take Host Kyle into the woods to find and harvest wild maitake that chef Karen Bell will prepare for dinner for the two of us.
11:45am: Arrive at maitake site and allow Kyle the chance to scan the area. He quickly finds the wild mushroom and describes it on camera as looking like coral. We harvest it and head back to our cars.

2011-09-07-Screenshot20110907at2.06.56PM.png

12:15pm: Arrive at Geneva Lakes Produce to pick up Michigan peaches, Swiss chard and sweet corn for Milwaukee deliveries.
12:45pm: Arrive at Haf’s orchard to shoot my apple pick up and for an interview with the orchard's owner Richard Polanski on the history of the orchard and what goes into his job.
3pm: Arrive at Le Reve to film my delivery to the restaurant. Host Kyle is presented with a bottle of Champagne and a tray full of French pastry desserts that will be used at tonight's dinner with chef Karen Bell.
4:15pm: Arrive at Cafe at the Plaza in downtown Milwaukee. Delivery of produce is filmed, and Karen is presented with the wild maitake that was found earlier. She begins to demo a dish she is crafting for dinner that night.
4:30pm: After shooting the delivery scene, I head out by myself to finish my last Milwaukee delivery of the day to Honeypie Cafe. Wisconsin Foodie decided not to film the delivery, because they had already previously done an episode on the cafe.
5:15pm: Back at Cafe at the Plaza to shoot the final scene of my Wisconsin Foodie profile. I eat dinner on camera.

Saturday, September 3
11am: Water plants, check thermostat temperatures.
12pm: Upload pictures in Facebook album into sequence that tells a story, add some photo descriptions.
3:30pm: Email friends and customers about the existence of One Guerrilla Farmer Facebook page.
6pm: GrillBBQ pork ribs and watch Brewers game.
9:30pm: Ice cream and lights out.

Sunday, September 4
6:50am: Dress and out the door. Quick stop for coffee with three creams.
7:22am: Back in the woods on a morning hike/mushroom hunt.
7:38am: One of the most beautiful finds I’ve ever had. Looks like fire coral rising up from the forest floor, really incredible.

2011-09-07-Screenshot20110907at2.23.20PM.png

9:15am: At greenhouse to check microgreen sprouting and water plants.
9:30am: Back at home, pancake breakfast, light reading, morning news shows.
11:30am: Playstation 3 - Major League Baseball... hours will go by...
5:30pm: Order pizza and watch Sunday night TV.

See previous Food Informants below:

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","slideshow_id":"40017","title":"Food Informants","created":"2011-08-03 16:57:47","is_anonymous_vote":"yes","lower_rank_value":"","higher_rank_value":"","top_5_text":"","type":"inline","total":14,"list":false,"slideimages":[{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"426182","type":"image","title":"Geoff Bartakovics, CEO Of Tasting Table","title_link":"Geoff_Bartakovics_CEO","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Tasting Table","config":null,"created":"2011-10-21 16:50:40","image_num":"0","caption":"Geoff Bartakovics, 34, is the co-founder and CEO of Tasting Table, the free daily email publication all about food & drink culture. Before starting Tasting Table, Geoff was a business manager in asset-backed finance at UBS Investment Bank, where he coordinated business activities among the fixed income trading desk and the bank's middle- and back-office functions. Geoff was formerly a business analyst at Deloitte Consulting. He attended The University of Chicago, from which he graduated with honors in English. He was a Fulbright Scholar in comparative literature and philosophy in Berlin and Hamburg. He's an obsessive dinner party entertainer and a serious home cook.\r\n\r\nRead Geoff's diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"0","votes":"0","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_426182_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_426182_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"415069","type":"image","title":"Elizabeth Laseter, Culinary Student","title_link":"Elizabeth_Laseter_Culinary","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Alamy","config":null,"created":"2011-10-17 14:05:47","image_num":"1","caption":"Elizabeth Laseter, an aspiring food journalist, is a recent graduate of Johns Hopkins University and lives in Washington, D.C. She received her diploma in Writing and Art History and is now pursuing a Culinary Arts Degree at L'Academie de Cuisine in Gaithersburg, Md. The one-year program includes six months of learning techniques in the classroom and six months at an externship in a D.C. fine dining restaurant. Elizabeth documents her food adventures through two blogs, The Baltimore Food Rag and The D.C. Food Rag. She decided to attend culinary school after interning at Baltimore magazine and working with the food editor.\r\n\r\nRead Elizabeth's full diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"0","votes":"0","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_415069_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_415069_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"402346","type":"image","title":"Jane Levan, Sustainable Chicken Farmer","title_link":"Jane_Levan_Sustainable","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-10-11 15:20:29","image_num":"2","caption":"Jane and Terry Levan operate a 20-acre pastured poultry farm outside of Lexington, Texas called Dewberry Hills Farm, after the dewberry vines that grow wild on their land. They raise antibiotic- and hormone-free meat chickens for sale. Their chickens mostly live outdoors. The Devans call themselves \"omnivores with a conscience;\" Jane won't eat any meat unless she personally knowns who raised it and how it was processed.\r\n\r\nJane and Terry began farming in 2003, after reading Fast Food Nation and The Omnivore's Dilemma. The pair had always wanted to farm, but they didn't want to follow the industrial agricultural model. Jane and Terry built a processing building on-site and became state certified so they could sell their birds commercially in May 2008.\r\n\r\nRead Jane's diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"6","votes":"1","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_402346_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_402346_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"388339","type":"image","title":"\"James,\" Apple Cafeteria Employee","title_link":"James_Apple_Cafeteria","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-10-04 14:04:31","image_num":"3","caption":"\"James\" is an Apple employee. He works at Caffe Macs, the on-site cafeteria of Apple's campus in Cupertino, Ca. Reminiscent of Google's epic food offerings, Caffe Macs is pretty much a corporate food court dream-come-true.\r\n\r\nRead James' diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"33","votes":"4","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_388339_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_388339_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"374554","type":"image","title":"Aaron Lefkove, New Restaurateur","title_link":"Aaron_Lefkove_New","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-09-27 10:57:45","image_num":"4","caption":"Brooklyn-based Aaron Lefkove used to work in book publishing and as a freelance writer. After his office re-located to New Jersey, Lefkove decided he didn't want to do the commute. Lefkove and his business partner, Andy Curtin, had the idea for a Cape Cod-style seafood joint for awhile. One day at a barbecue, they decided to commit to opening a restaurant, Littleneck, Brooklyn's first and only classic New England-style beach side seafood shack.\r\n\r\nBesides working in restaurants growing up, Lefkove had no experience as a restaurateur. He acknowledges that the process has been a major learning curve, but so far, there haven't been any obstacles they couldn't get around. At first, he thought opening up a clam shack would be easier than finding a new job but it turns it that it is actually \"WAY WAY WAY harder.\" Despite this being the \"hardest, most stressful, most frustrating, most time consuming, most ambitious thing\" he has ever done, it isn't nearly as hard as he thought it would be. Plus, he says he loves working for himself, working toward something he has \"always dreamed about,\" and building something really exciting.\r\n\r\nRead Aaron Lefkove's diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"125","votes":"23","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_374554_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_374554_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"359012","type":"image","title":"Jonathan Stich, Restaurant Delivery Farmer","title_link":"Jonathan_Stich_Restaurant","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-09-12 18:03:41","image_num":"5","caption":"Jonathan Stich, 29, is a third generation farmer from Burlington, Wisconsin. He grew weary of the corporate world, went traveling and decided to become a farmer. After reading about how heirloom tomato grower Tim Stark in Pennsylvania sells his products to New York restaurants, Stich made the decision to spend a night in restaurants in Milwaukee and Chicago asking if they'd be interesting in buying local produce.\r\n\r\nRead more about Jonathan Stich's week here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"95","votes":"19","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_359012_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_359012_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"352441","type":"image","title":"Erika Nakamura And Amelia Posada, Butchers","title_link":"Erika_Nakamura_And","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Yugo Nakamura","config":null,"created":"2011-09-07 14:32:33","image_num":"6","caption":"Erika Nakamura and Amelia Posada are the owners, managers and butchers in chief of LA's artisanal butcher shop Lindy and Grundy. (Erika is Grundy and Amelia is Lindy.) The two, who also live together and are a couple, opened their store on Fairfax last spring (profiled on HuffPost Food). Lindy and Grundy has already been feted as one of the most best butchers in Southern California -- and quite possibly its most sustainable.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Erika Nakamura and Amelia Posada's here.<\/a><\/strong>","rating":"104","votes":"17","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_352441_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_352441_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"347901","type":"image","title":"Karl Wilder, Chef Living On A Food Stamp Budget","title_link":"Karl_Wilder_Chef","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-09-01 15:13:16","image_num":"7","caption":"Recently, inspired by a meeting at the San Francisco Food Bank, chef Karl Wilder started the food stamp challenge: living and eating on a food stamp budget. What began as a one week project has turned into a two-month long commitment. Wilder calculated that a family has $1.33 to spend per meal, and decided that when using oil and seasonings, the cost would be $1.22. In total, he has less than $4 to spend on food per day. He monitors his nutrition and caloric intake on FitDay. You can read more about his daily experiences at on his blog, Fusion On The Fly.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Karl Wilder here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"54","votes":"11","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_347901_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_347901_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"337354","type":"image","title":"Chris Cosentino, Chef And Offal Authority","title_link":"Chris_Cosentino_Chef","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Beta Brand","config":null,"created":"2011-08-23 17:13:49","image_num":"8","caption":"Chris Cosentino is the executive chef of San Francisco's Incanto, an offal-heavy (not sure what offal is? Check out our Whole Animal Guide here) rustic Italian restaurant located in San Francisco. While encouraging patrons to try different cuts of meat, Cosentino also champions eating locally. He's previously cooked at such renowned restaurants as Kinkead's and Chez Panisse, and cites Jean-Louis Palladin as a big influence on his cooking style. He also co-owns Boccalone, which sells various cured meats and house-made salami. To learn more about Cosentino, check out his website, Offal Good.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Chris Cosentino here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"135","votes":"29","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_337354_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_337354_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"332805","type":"image","title":"\"Jane,\" Trader Joe's Employee","title_link":"Jane_Trader_Joes","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Flickr: ingridjee","config":null,"created":"2011-08-18 11:01:21","image_num":"9","caption":"\"Jane,\" 24, has been working for Trader Joe's since 2007, though in 2009 she left for over a year to go work for Whole Foods. She did not like it there and returned to TJ's. At Trader Joe's, every employee does a range of tasks, but Jane's speciality is dairy. Below is her explanation of the pros and cons of the job:\r\n\r\nI like working for Trader Joe's because they pay me well and offer great benefits. They also respect me as an employee and make me feel like I'm useful and needed and not just another part-time employee that can be replaced (which has been the case at other retail jobs I've had). Trader Joe's is really good at hiring great people and I'm lucky to have so many wonderful co-workers. I don't like working at Trader Joe's because the work can be strenuous on my back and wrists. Being on a register for several hours at a time is tiring and somewhat soul crushing due to ignorant people who feel the need to be condescending to me because I work at a grocery store. I also feel that the company is becoming more and more corporate as it grows and it is beginning to have an impact on the enjoyability of being a part-time \"crew member.\" I also work in a very busy store which causes the managers to stress out a lot and I don't enjoy being surrounded by it.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of a Trader Joe's employee here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"171","votes":"37","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_332805_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_332805_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"325677","type":"image","title":"Nate Appleman, Chipotle Culinary Manager","title_link":"Nate_Appleman_Chipotle","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-09 12:14:44","image_num":"10","caption":"Chef Nate Appleman is the Culinary Manager at Chipotle. This involves a range of tasks including developing new menu items, opening ShopHouse (Chipotle's upcoming Asian fast-casual chain) and furthering Chipotle's commitment to sustainable sourcing. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Appleman was previously executive chef and co-owner of San Francisco's super popular Italian restaurants A16 and SPQR. Appleman moved to New York in 2010 to open Pulino's. After leaving, Appleman took his current position at Chipotle. He has received a James Beard award for Rising Star Chef, been anointed Best New Chef by Food & Wine and is the champion of Food Network's Chopped All-Stars.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Nate Appleman here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"949","votes":"192","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_325677_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_325677_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"321887","type":"image","title":"Gio Andollo, Freegan","title_link":"Gio_Andollo_Freegan","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-03 17:01:36","image_num":"11","caption":"Freeganism is a lifestyle in which one employs \"alternative strategies for living based on limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources.\" Gio Andollo is a writer, artist, musician and freegan. Andollo became a freegan when he realized that artists don't get paid much, but he didn't like the idea of working a \"crappy, part-time job\" to pay the bills. So he found another way. Andollo performs on the subway for about 20 hours a week, typically in two-hour intervals. He makes $10 to $50 per shift and has a love\/hate relationship with busking. Andollo will buy food, but very rarely. The majority of his food comes from trash touring, or dumpster diving. He's become increasingly concerned with the abuses inherent in current economic systems: waste of resources, exploitation of people, degradation of the environment, calloused treatment of animals, commodification of time, labor, even war (thus human life in wholesale). In addition to busking part-time, he writes songs, blogs and books about these issues. \r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Gio Andollo here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"1098","votes":"206","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321887_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321887_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"321884","type":"image","title":"Jason Joyce, Sustainable Maine Lobsterman","title_link":"Jason_Joyce_Sustainable","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-03 16:59:58","image_num":"12","caption":"Captain Jason Joyce is an eighth-generation resident of Swan's Island, Maine. He is a Coast Guard Licensed Captain and a registered Maine Tidewater Guide. He has done lobster and fish research with the University of Maine, the University of Massachusetts, the Gulf of Maine Research Institute and the Lobster Institute. Joyce is currently doing a lot of work with the Penobscot East Resource Center, which works to secure a viable future for the fishing communities of eastern Maine. Each week, he records HD video of lobstering that he gives to restaurants to educate customers about sustainable lobster fisheries in Maine. Captain Joyce is married to his high school sweetheart and they have four children. Learn more about Captain Jason Joyce here.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Jason Joyce here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"1082","votes":"189","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321884_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321884_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"321879","type":"image","title":"Martin Kastner, Serviceware Designer","title_link":"Martin_Kastner_Serviceware","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-03 16:58:21","image_num":"13","caption":"Martin Kastner is a serviceware designer extraordinaire\/jack-of-all-design-trades for Grant Achatz's Alinea, Next and The Aviary. Kastner creates custom pieces that work with Achatz's elaborate and intricate food. Born in the Czech Republic, Kastner trained as a blacksmith and received an MFA in sculpture. (His thesis was about air). He met his American wife in Prague and moved to the US in 1998. In 2003, Kastner received an unexpected email from Grant Achatz, who had emailed a host of designers. Kastner was the only one to respond. They've partnered not only on serviceware, but also on web design, video and the Alinea cookbook. Kastner's other clients include L20 (an upscale, seafood-focused Chicago restaurant), Le Bernardin (Eric Ripert's homage to seafood) and Empellon (Alex Stupak's new Mexican restaurant in New York).\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Martin Kastner here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"1008","votes":"172","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321879_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321879_sq50.jpg"}],"slide_html":"","more_slideshows":[{"entry_id":"5489584","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/regina-varolli\/dessert-professional-taps_b_5489584.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/353763\/slide_353763_3850532_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/353763\/slide_353763_3850532_small.jpg","title":"Dessert Professional's Top Ten Pastry Chefs in America","slideshow_id":"353763","vertical":"food"},{"entry_id":"5256481","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/justluxe\/feast-like-a-character-of_b_5256481.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/347917\/slide_347917_3696145_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/347917\/slide_347917_3696145_small.jpg","title":"Feast Like A Character of Game Of Thrones At One of These 8 Restaurants","slideshow_id":"347917","vertical":"food"},{"entry_id":"4867536","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/fodors\/10-cheeses-worth-travelin_b_4867536.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/338994\/slide_338994_3466473_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/338994\/slide_338994_3466473_small.jpg","title":"10 Cheeses Worth Traveling For","slideshow_id":"338994","vertical":"food"},{"entry_id":"4690222","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/2014\/01\/29\/girl-scouts-gluten-free-cookie_n_4690222.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/313335\/slide_313335_2812562_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/313335\/slide_313335_2812562_small.jpg","title":"Gluten Free Bread Recipes","slideshow_id":"313335","vertical":"food"}]};
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","slideshow_id":"40017","title":"Food Informants","created":"2011-08-03 16:57:47","is_anonymous_vote":"yes","lower_rank_value":"","higher_rank_value":"","top_5_text":"","type":"inline","total":14,"list":false,"slideimages":[{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"426182","type":"image","title":"Geoff Bartakovics, CEO Of Tasting Table","title_link":"Geoff_Bartakovics_CEO","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Tasting Table","config":null,"created":"2011-10-21 16:50:40","image_num":"0","caption":"Geoff Bartakovics, 34, is the co-founder and CEO of Tasting Table, the free daily email publication all about food & drink culture. Before starting Tasting Table, Geoff was a business manager in asset-backed finance at UBS Investment Bank, where he coordinated business activities among the fixed income trading desk and the bank's middle- and back-office functions. Geoff was formerly a business analyst at Deloitte Consulting. He attended The University of Chicago, from which he graduated with honors in English. He was a Fulbright Scholar in comparative literature and philosophy in Berlin and Hamburg. He's an obsessive dinner party entertainer and a serious home cook.\r\n\r\nRead Geoff's diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"0","votes":"0","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_426182_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_426182_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"415069","type":"image","title":"Elizabeth Laseter, Culinary Student","title_link":"Elizabeth_Laseter_Culinary","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Alamy","config":null,"created":"2011-10-17 14:05:47","image_num":"1","caption":"Elizabeth Laseter, an aspiring food journalist, is a recent graduate of Johns Hopkins University and lives in Washington, D.C. She received her diploma in Writing and Art History and is now pursuing a Culinary Arts Degree at L'Academie de Cuisine in Gaithersburg, Md. The one-year program includes six months of learning techniques in the classroom and six months at an externship in a D.C. fine dining restaurant. Elizabeth documents her food adventures through two blogs, The Baltimore Food Rag and The D.C. Food Rag. She decided to attend culinary school after interning at Baltimore magazine and working with the food editor.\r\n\r\nRead Elizabeth's full diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"0","votes":"0","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_415069_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_415069_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"402346","type":"image","title":"Jane Levan, Sustainable Chicken Farmer","title_link":"Jane_Levan_Sustainable","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-10-11 15:20:29","image_num":"2","caption":"Jane and Terry Levan operate a 20-acre pastured poultry farm outside of Lexington, Texas called Dewberry Hills Farm, after the dewberry vines that grow wild on their land. They raise antibiotic- and hormone-free meat chickens for sale. Their chickens mostly live outdoors. The Devans call themselves \"omnivores with a conscience;\" Jane won't eat any meat unless she personally knowns who raised it and how it was processed.\r\n\r\nJane and Terry began farming in 2003, after reading Fast Food Nation and The Omnivore's Dilemma. The pair had always wanted to farm, but they didn't want to follow the industrial agricultural model. Jane and Terry built a processing building on-site and became state certified so they could sell their birds commercially in May 2008.\r\n\r\nRead Jane's diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"6","votes":"1","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_402346_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_402346_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"388339","type":"image","title":"\"James,\" Apple Cafeteria Employee","title_link":"James_Apple_Cafeteria","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-10-04 14:04:31","image_num":"3","caption":"\"James\" is an Apple employee. He works at Caffe Macs, the on-site cafeteria of Apple's campus in Cupertino, Ca. Reminiscent of Google's epic food offerings, Caffe Macs is pretty much a corporate food court dream-come-true.\r\n\r\nRead James' diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"33","votes":"4","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_388339_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_388339_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"374554","type":"image","title":"Aaron Lefkove, New Restaurateur","title_link":"Aaron_Lefkove_New","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-09-27 10:57:45","image_num":"4","caption":"Brooklyn-based Aaron Lefkove used to work in book publishing and as a freelance writer. After his office re-located to New Jersey, Lefkove decided he didn't want to do the commute. Lefkove and his business partner, Andy Curtin, had the idea for a Cape Cod-style seafood joint for awhile. One day at a barbecue, they decided to commit to opening a restaurant, Littleneck, Brooklyn's first and only classic New England-style beach side seafood shack.\r\n\r\nBesides working in restaurants growing up, Lefkove had no experience as a restaurateur. He acknowledges that the process has been a major learning curve, but so far, there haven't been any obstacles they couldn't get around. At first, he thought opening up a clam shack would be easier than finding a new job but it turns it that it is actually \"WAY WAY WAY harder.\" Despite this being the \"hardest, most stressful, most frustrating, most time consuming, most ambitious thing\" he has ever done, it isn't nearly as hard as he thought it would be. Plus, he says he loves working for himself, working toward something he has \"always dreamed about,\" and building something really exciting.\r\n\r\nRead Aaron Lefkove's diary here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"125","votes":"23","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_374554_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_374554_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"359012","type":"image","title":"Jonathan Stich, Restaurant Delivery Farmer","title_link":"Jonathan_Stich_Restaurant","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-09-12 18:03:41","image_num":"5","caption":"Jonathan Stich, 29, is a third generation farmer from Burlington, Wisconsin. He grew weary of the corporate world, went traveling and decided to become a farmer. After reading about how heirloom tomato grower Tim Stark in Pennsylvania sells his products to New York restaurants, Stich made the decision to spend a night in restaurants in Milwaukee and Chicago asking if they'd be interesting in buying local produce.\r\n\r\nRead more about Jonathan Stich's week here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"95","votes":"19","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_359012_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_359012_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"352441","type":"image","title":"Erika Nakamura And Amelia Posada, Butchers","title_link":"Erika_Nakamura_And","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Yugo Nakamura","config":null,"created":"2011-09-07 14:32:33","image_num":"6","caption":"Erika Nakamura and Amelia Posada are the owners, managers and butchers in chief of LA's artisanal butcher shop Lindy and Grundy. (Erika is Grundy and Amelia is Lindy.) The two, who also live together and are a couple, opened their store on Fairfax last spring (profiled on HuffPost Food). Lindy and Grundy has already been feted as one of the most best butchers in Southern California -- and quite possibly its most sustainable.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Erika Nakamura and Amelia Posada's here.<\/a><\/strong>","rating":"104","votes":"17","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_352441_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_352441_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"347901","type":"image","title":"Karl Wilder, Chef Living On A Food Stamp Budget","title_link":"Karl_Wilder_Chef","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-09-01 15:13:16","image_num":"7","caption":"Recently, inspired by a meeting at the San Francisco Food Bank, chef Karl Wilder started the food stamp challenge: living and eating on a food stamp budget. What began as a one week project has turned into a two-month long commitment. Wilder calculated that a family has $1.33 to spend per meal, and decided that when using oil and seasonings, the cost would be $1.22. In total, he has less than $4 to spend on food per day. He monitors his nutrition and caloric intake on FitDay. You can read more about his daily experiences at on his blog, Fusion On The Fly.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Karl Wilder here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"54","votes":"11","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_347901_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_347901_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"337354","type":"image","title":"Chris Cosentino, Chef And Offal Authority","title_link":"Chris_Cosentino_Chef","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Beta Brand","config":null,"created":"2011-08-23 17:13:49","image_num":"8","caption":"Chris Cosentino is the executive chef of San Francisco's Incanto, an offal-heavy (not sure what offal is? Check out our Whole Animal Guide here) rustic Italian restaurant located in San Francisco. While encouraging patrons to try different cuts of meat, Cosentino also champions eating locally. He's previously cooked at such renowned restaurants as Kinkead's and Chez Panisse, and cites Jean-Louis Palladin as a big influence on his cooking style. He also co-owns Boccalone, which sells various cured meats and house-made salami. To learn more about Cosentino, check out his website, Offal Good.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Chris Cosentino here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"135","votes":"29","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_337354_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_337354_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"332805","type":"image","title":"\"Jane,\" Trader Joe's Employee","title_link":"Jane_Trader_Joes","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"Flickr: ingridjee","config":null,"created":"2011-08-18 11:01:21","image_num":"9","caption":"\"Jane,\" 24, has been working for Trader Joe's since 2007, though in 2009 she left for over a year to go work for Whole Foods. She did not like it there and returned to TJ's. At Trader Joe's, every employee does a range of tasks, but Jane's speciality is dairy. Below is her explanation of the pros and cons of the job:\r\n\r\nI like working for Trader Joe's because they pay me well and offer great benefits. They also respect me as an employee and make me feel like I'm useful and needed and not just another part-time employee that can be replaced (which has been the case at other retail jobs I've had). Trader Joe's is really good at hiring great people and I'm lucky to have so many wonderful co-workers. I don't like working at Trader Joe's because the work can be strenuous on my back and wrists. Being on a register for several hours at a time is tiring and somewhat soul crushing due to ignorant people who feel the need to be condescending to me because I work at a grocery store. I also feel that the company is becoming more and more corporate as it grows and it is beginning to have an impact on the enjoyability of being a part-time \"crew member.\" I also work in a very busy store which causes the managers to stress out a lot and I don't enjoy being surrounded by it.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of a Trader Joe's employee here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"171","votes":"37","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_332805_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_332805_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"325677","type":"image","title":"Nate Appleman, Chipotle Culinary Manager","title_link":"Nate_Appleman_Chipotle","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-09 12:14:44","image_num":"10","caption":"Chef Nate Appleman is the Culinary Manager at Chipotle. This involves a range of tasks including developing new menu items, opening ShopHouse (Chipotle's upcoming Asian fast-casual chain) and furthering Chipotle's commitment to sustainable sourcing. A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America, Appleman was previously executive chef and co-owner of San Francisco's super popular Italian restaurants A16 and SPQR. Appleman moved to New York in 2010 to open Pulino's. After leaving, Appleman took his current position at Chipotle. He has received a James Beard award for Rising Star Chef, been anointed Best New Chef by Food & Wine and is the champion of Food Network's Chopped All-Stars.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Nate Appleman here.<\/strong><\/a>","rating":"949","votes":"192","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_325677_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_325677_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"321887","type":"image","title":"Gio Andollo, Freegan","title_link":"Gio_Andollo_Freegan","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-03 17:01:36","image_num":"11","caption":"Freeganism is a lifestyle in which one employs \"alternative strategies for living based on limited participation in the conventional economy and minimal consumption of resources.\" Gio Andollo is a writer, artist, musician and freegan. Andollo became a freegan when he realized that artists don't get paid much, but he didn't like the idea of working a \"crappy, part-time job\" to pay the bills. So he found another way. Andollo performs on the subway for about 20 hours a week, typically in two-hour intervals. He makes $10 to $50 per shift and has a love\/hate relationship with busking. Andollo will buy food, but very rarely. The majority of his food comes from trash touring, or dumpster diving. He's become increasingly concerned with the abuses inherent in current economic systems: waste of resources, exploitation of people, degradation of the environment, calloused treatment of animals, commodification of time, labor, even war (thus human life in wholesale). In addition to busking part-time, he writes songs, blogs and books about these issues. \r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Gio Andollo here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"1098","votes":"206","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321887_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321887_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"321884","type":"image","title":"Jason Joyce, Sustainable Maine Lobsterman","title_link":"Jason_Joyce_Sustainable","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-03 16:59:58","image_num":"12","caption":"Captain Jason Joyce is an eighth-generation resident of Swan's Island, Maine. He is a Coast Guard Licensed Captain and a registered Maine Tidewater Guide. He has done lobster and fish research with the University of Maine, the University of Massachusetts, the Gulf of Maine Research Institute and the Lobster Institute. Joyce is currently doing a lot of work with the Penobscot East Resource Center, which works to secure a viable future for the fishing communities of eastern Maine. Each week, he records HD video of lobstering that he gives to restaurants to educate customers about sustainable lobster fisheries in Maine. Captain Joyce is married to his high school sweetheart and they have four children. Learn more about Captain Jason Joyce here.\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Jason Joyce here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"1082","votes":"189","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321884_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321884_sq50.jpg"},{"slide_id":"40017","slideimage_id":"321879","type":"image","title":"Martin Kastner, Serviceware Designer","title_link":"Martin_Kastner_Serviceware","width":"0","height":"0","credits":"","config":null,"created":"2011-08-03 16:58:21","image_num":"13","caption":"Martin Kastner is a serviceware designer extraordinaire\/jack-of-all-design-trades for Grant Achatz's Alinea, Next and The Aviary. Kastner creates custom pieces that work with Achatz's elaborate and intricate food. Born in the Czech Republic, Kastner trained as a blacksmith and received an MFA in sculpture. (His thesis was about air). He met his American wife in Prague and moved to the US in 1998. In 2003, Kastner received an unexpected email from Grant Achatz, who had emailed a host of designers. Kastner was the only one to respond. They've partnered not only on serviceware, but also on web design, video and the Alinea cookbook. Kastner's other clients include L20 (an upscale, seafood-focused Chicago restaurant), Le Bernardin (Eric Ripert's homage to seafood) and Empellon (Alex Stupak's new Mexican restaurant in New York).\r\n\r\nRead about a week in the life of Martin Kastner here<\/a>.<\/strong>","rating":"1008","votes":"172","slideimage_crops":[],"slideimage_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321879_free.jpg","slideimage_thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/40017\/slide_40017_321879_sq50.jpg"}],"slide_html":"","more_slideshows":[{"entry_id":"5489584","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/regina-varolli\/dessert-professional-taps_b_5489584.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/353763\/slide_353763_3850532_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/353763\/slide_353763_3850532_small.jpg","title":"Dessert Professional's Top Ten Pastry Chefs in America","slideshow_id":"353763","vertical":"food"},{"entry_id":"5256481","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/justluxe\/feast-like-a-character-of_b_5256481.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/347917\/slide_347917_3696145_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/347917\/slide_347917_3696145_small.jpg","title":"Feast Like A Character of Game Of Thrones At One of These 8 Restaurants","slideshow_id":"347917","vertical":"food"},{"entry_id":"4867536","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/fodors\/10-cheeses-worth-travelin_b_4867536.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/338994\/slide_338994_3466473_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/338994\/slide_338994_3466473_small.jpg","title":"10 Cheeses Worth Traveling For","slideshow_id":"338994","vertical":"food"},{"entry_id":"4690222","entry_url":"http:\/\/www.huffingtonpost.com\/2014\/01\/29\/girl-scouts-gluten-free-cookie_n_4690222.html","content_type":"image","image_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/313335\/slide_313335_2812562_small.jpg","thumbnail_url":"http:\/\/i.huffpost.com\/gadgets\/slideshows\/313335\/slide_313335_2812562_small.jpg","title":"Gluten Free Bread Recipes","slideshow_id":"313335","vertical":"food"}]};
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