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TED Conference Launches All-Access Membership For Small Businesses

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Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg delivers a memorable TED talk on women in business.
Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg delivers a memorable TED talk on women in business.

TED, the yearly national and global conference that brings together some of the greatest minds and innovators in society is making access to its talks even easier with the introduction of TED Live.

The year-long subscription service allows individuals, small businesses and schools virtual access to the upcoming TED conferences, the online community, a subscription to TED Books and an Amazon Kindle Fire e-reader.

The TED conferences, which are held annually in California and Scotland, were started 25 years ago by the non-profit. The initiative, which promotes "Ideas Worth Spreading," has hosted an impressive list of influential leaders including Bill Gates, Richard Branson, Jane Goodall and Elizabeth Gilbert. The talks can be viewed for free on TED.com, where transcripts and translations are also available.

The TED Live membership is an opportunity to further engage small businesses and individuals in the motivating talks and active community. "TED Live creates an opportunity for small businesses to bond while watching the TED conferences live. The inspirational subject matter will spur creativity for any company," said Sokunthea Sa Chhabra, TED Live program manager. The membership is available in two tiers: $995 per year for individuals and primary and secondary schools or $2,500 per year for universities and small businesses. In addition to virtual access to the live conferences, members will receive digital versions of TED books twice a month for a year on the provided Kindle Fire e-reader, which can also be used to view TEDTalks and videos from TED.com.

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