Huffpost Latino Voices

Celebrities Who've Changed Their Names To Broaden Market Appeal (PHOTOS)

Posted: Updated:
Charlie Sheen presents the award for best shooter onstage at Spike TV's Video Game Awards on Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011, in Culver City, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)
Charlie Sheen presents the award for best shooter onstage at Spike TV's Video Game Awards on Saturday, Dec. 10, 2011, in Culver City, Calif. (AP Photo/Chris Pizzello)

Once upon a time stars Anglicized their names to appeal to a broader market. A Mexican-American musician, most famous for the early rock-and-roll hit La Bamba, changed his name from Richard Valenzuela to Ritchie Valens at the encouragement of record executives. Charlie Sheen was born Carlos Estevez. Anthony Quinn was once Antonio Rodolfo Quinn-Oaxaca.

But more and more it seems celebrities are changing their names to be more appealing to their audiences by reinforcing their Hispanic heritage. Journalist Geraldo Rivera used to be Gerald, and Carlos Mencia? His real name is Ned!

Even non-Latinos are getting into the game. Up and coming musician, Lana del Rey doesn't have any Latina or Spanish ancestry. Rather, she thought the Latina name would help complete the persona she's adopted to help interest audiences and sell albums.

Take a look below at celebrities who've either Anglicized or Hispanicized their names. Let us know your thoughts about all of this by voting and in comments below.

Close
Latino Name Changes
of
Share
Tweet
Advertisement
Share this
close
Current Slide


all-also-on-huffpost

Suggest a correction

Around the Web

For Many Latinos, Racial Identity Is More Culture Than Color

mun2 Tackles Taboos of Race and Ethnicity With Provocative "Black and Latino"

Millions of Latinos Deny Their Own Ethnicity on Census Forms, USC Study Says

American Family . About the Family. What It Means to Be Latino | PBS