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'Push Girls,' Sundance Reality Show, Aims To Open Up Discussion About Disabilities

Push Girls

First Posted: 01/18/12 03:40 PM ET Updated: 01/18/12 03:40 PM ET

For the four paralyzed women starring in a new reality series, the show is about pushing right through stereotypes, disappointments and career obstacles.

Set to debut in April, "Push Girls" will give viewers an unscripted look into the lives of four gorgeous ladies who became disabled after enduring tragic car accidents or debilitating diseases, the Sundance Channel announced. Producers hope that by bringing the series into mainstream television, they'll demonstrate how strong people with disabilities are -- and that it's OK to look and talk about their conditions.

"The indomitable spirit of this series will give viewers permission to stare at a world that they may previously have been too polite -- or too frightened -- to explore," Sarah Barnett, Sundance Channel's General Manager, said in a release.

When it comes to fear, that's something these ladies refuse to cart around in their wheelchairs.

"Most people would want to give up," Tiphany Adams, 28, the sole survivor of a car crash that claimed the lives of three friends when she was in high school, told the New York Post. "But all four of us girls chose to triumph over the tragedy."

These girls -- one was once a swim star, another a hip hop dancer -- each left one dream from their youth behind, but is driven to pursue new dreams involving motherhood, relationships, athletics and stardom.

"Push Girls’" producer, Gay Rosenthal, has taken a cue from her past series about empowering those living with disabilities. Rosenthal worked on "Little People, Big World," a show about a couple, each 4-feet tall, raising a family in Oregon and "Ruby," the story of a morbidly obese woman trying to lose hundreds of pounds.

"Watching the Push Girls tackling life with spirit and confidence is not only inspiring but compelling," Rosenthal told C21 Media. "The show challenges perceptions about life in a wheelchair, giving the audience an honest, no-nonsense look into their world."

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Filed by Emily Heinz  |