iOS app Android app More

Rose Cliver, 1906 San Francisco Earthquake Survivor, Dies (PHOTOS)

Rose Cliver

First Posted: 02/20/2012 4:57 pm Updated: 02/20/2012 7:04 pm

Rose Cliver, the oldest remaining survivor of San Francisco's 1906 earthquake, died Saturday at her home in Santa Rosa. She was 109.

Cliver, who was three years old when the great quake ripped San Francisco in half, lived in the city for her nearly her entire life. The day disaster struck, she told the San Francisco Chronicle in an earlier interview, she and her family climbed Bernal Hill and "watched San Francisco burn."

(SCROLL DOWN FOR HISTORIC PHOTOS)

This year's annual earthquake remembrance celebration, which takes place at John's Grill in Union Square, will be dedicated in Cliver's honor. "She was really a pistol," Lee Houskeeper, one of the event's organizers, told SF Weekly.

According to CBS News, only two earthquake survivors have outlived Cliver: Bill DelMonte, 105, of Marin County, and Ruth Newman, 109, a Pebble Beach resident.

The April 18, 1906 earthquake and subsequent fire killed more than 1,000 San Franciscans and destroyed more than 28,000 structures. Take a look at a gallery of historic images from the disaster below:

Loading Slideshow...
  • San Franciscans watch the city burn.

  • Washington & Mason Car and Powerhouse

  • Howard Street, between 18th Street & 19th Street

  • Washington & Mason Car and Powerhouse

  • Sutter and Polk Car and Powerhouse

  • Washington & Mason Car and Powerhouse

  • Burnt Powell Street Cable Cars on Bay & Taylor Streets.

  • Millbrae Sub Station

  • From safer vantage points, residents stand amid ruined buildings on Sacramento Street, watching fires in downtown San Francisco after the earthquake in April 1906.

  • The Hibernia Bank building is in ruins following the massive earthquake that devastated the San Francisco area, April 18, 1906.

  • Refugees of the great San Francisco earthquake stand outside their tents at the Presidio, San Francisco, Calif., April 1906.

  • Houses lean at bizarre angles on Howard Street near 17th Street in San Francisco following the disastrous earthquake that nearly leveled the city, April 18, 1906. Note how the tall house at center has separated from its foundation and leans against its neighbor.

  • A section of San Francisco, looking east across Grant Avenue toward Yerba Buena Island, shows the ravages of the great earthquake and the resulting fires that nearly leveled the city, April 18, 1906. The Ferry Tower can be seen in the upper right in the background.

  • A photographer in front of City Hall takes photos of the disaster resulting from the April 18, 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, Ca.

  • This is a view of the destruction in Nob Hill resulting from the April 18, 1906 earthquake in San Francisco, Ca. Following the damages caused by the force of the earthquake, fire spread into the area, reducing much of the remaining structures to rubble.

  • The City Hall building is shown badly damaged by the severe earthquake of April 18, 1906 in San Francisco, Ca.

  • This photo shows the buckled pavement and curbstones at the corner of 18th Street and Lexington Street resulting from the earthquake on April 18, 1906 in San Francisco, Calif.

  • This photograph shows the damaged El Camino Real, one of the main Pacific Coastal highways, after the 1906 earthquake at Colma, South of San Francisco.

  • A view of a refugee camp set up for survivors of the massive earthquake that nearly leveled San Francisco, in April of 1906.

  • Residents of Castro Street set up kitchen stoves in the street due to damage to chimneys in the aftermath of the earthquake that nearly leveled San Francisco in April of 1906.

  • Residents of Nob Hill live in tents set up for the homeless, following the devastating earthquake that nearly decimated San Francisco, April 18, 1906.

  • A business posts a sign reassuring customers that their valuables are safe with them, following the devastating earthquake that nearly leveled San Francisco, April 18, 1906.

  • The Fairmont Hotel stands amidst the destruction from the 1906 earthquake in San Francisco. The hotel was originally scheduled to open in April 1906, but was delayed a year because of the earthquake.

  • The Winchester Hotel is shown burning during the San Francisco earthquake on April 18, 1906.

  • Damage to row houses on Howard Street in San Francisco is in evidence as signs of life return to the street following the massive earthquake, April 18, 1906.

  • Red Cross relief is seen in San Francisco after the great earthquake, April 18, 1906.

FOLLOW HUFFPOST SAN FRANCISCO

Filed by Carly Schwartz  |