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Happy Birthday, Dr. Seuss: 7 Facts You Didn't Know About The Author

  First Posted: 03/ 2/2012 8:35 am   Updated: 03/ 2/2012 8:48 am

By Margaret Bristol for Bookish

Theodor Seuss Geisel, aka Dr. Seuss, wrote more than 60 children’s books, many of which became must-haves for every kid’s library before his death in 1991. Most recently, fans got to read one more posthumous release: Seven short works originally published in '50s magazines were released as an anthology last fall called "The Bippolo Seed and Other Lost Stories." In honor of the latest Seuss-to-screen adaptation, "The Lorax," hitting theaters this weekend, we've dug up seven fun facts about Seuss that may surprise you.

Making a Name for Himself
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How did Geisel adopt the nom de plume Dr. Seuss? According to Philip Nel, author of "Dr. Seuss: American Icon," the pen name appeared years before Geisel published his first children's book, "And to Think That I Saw It on Mulberry Street!"

In 1925, Dartmouth student Geisel was caught drinking gin with some buddie--during Prohibition. As punishment, Geisel was forced to pull out of extracurricular activities, including his role as editor-in-chief at a student magazine. After that, Geisel chose to publish his work under a variety of assumed names, one of which was Dr. Seuss. Geisel later also published children's books under the names Theo LeSieg and Rosetta Stone--these pseudonyms appear on books that he wrote but didn't illustrate.
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