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Karl Lagerfeld On Japanese People: Junk Food Has Made Them 'Bigger'

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Shy wallflower Karl Lagerfeld has finally, bravely, opened up and shared some of his thoughts to Women's Wear Daily.

Just kidding. We all know talking about Karl is one of Karl's favorite activities.

This most recent edition of "Karl Chat" comes to us from Asia, where Lagerfeld is making his first trip to Japan in eight years to promote his new photography book and the corresponding Chanel-themed exhibition “The Little Black Jacket.”

At the opening party, Lagerfeld gave Women's Wear Daily some unsolicited opinions about the... bodies of Japanese people?

“It’s changed a lot but it’s changed for the better I think. I noticed that people became bigger than before because now they eat more cake and sweets and things like this that they didn’t do in the past. There’s a real change in the look of the Japanese people. Normally, before, they were all tiny. It’s the kind of beauty you get from junk food,”

Well, in case you were wondering, residents of Japan, what Chanel's head designer thinks about your figures, there you have it.

We're not too surprised, though -- Karl recently made some very controversial statements about Adele's weight.

And despite his well-documented love for Nobu's sashimi, Kaiser Karl claims that there's one part of Japanese cuisine he can't stand to eat, WWD reports:

“You know I don’t eat bread, I don’t eat sugar, I don’t eat meat, so for me, the Japanese kitchen is perfect,” he said. Although he made one noteworthy exception. “I hate rice,” he said emphatically, recalling a time when he had to eat a rice-only diet for 11 days to recover from an illness. “After that I could never have rice again in my life.”

Karl will be in Japan for three weeks, hosting a Chanel pop-up shop and perhaps making more sweeping observations about your weight.

Click over to WWD for more Karl bon (?) mots.

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Karl Lagerfeld Approves of Junk Food in Japan