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Glen Folkard, Australian Shark Attack Surfer Lives To Show Off Scar And Tell Miraculous Survival Tale (GRAPHIC PHOTOS)

The Huffington Post  |  By Posted: 03/24/2012 6:24 pm Updated: 03/24/2012 7:06 pm

An Australian surfer has lived to tell the tale of a shark attack so terrifying, that it would put Steven Spielberg's 'Jaws' to shame.

Forty-four-year-old Glen Folkard was surfing near Newcastle, 80 miles north of Sydney, Australia in January this year, when a bull shark came out of nowhere and threw him from his board. Folkard was pulled below the surface and the shark sunk its teeth into his thigh.

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But when the animal released his grip for another go, Folkard seized the moment to escape and safely swam back to shore where two lifeguards helped him.

"It was everything you'd think it would be, just sheer terror," Folkard told Agence France-Presse.

"He's hit me from underneath, he's grabbed me, he's turned me, took me under and then let go cause I think he had fiberglass in his mouth... and that was my chance," he added.

After spending several days in intensive care suffering from massive blood loss, Folkard came out alive, but not unscathed.

The bull shark left an impressive scar on his right buttock. The 10-ft-long animal also took off 4 pounds of flesh, notes the Daily Mail

This isn't the first attack of its kind.

A 28-year-old man survived a shark bite on his arm while surfing off North Avoca, about 55 miles north of Sydney, on Jan. 3, the Associated Press reports.

To see more photos of the aftermath of Glen Folkard's shark attack, check out the slideshow below.

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Australian surfer Glen Folkard (L), sporting a massive scar, displays his damaged surf board at his home in Newcastle on February 23, 2012 after he was attacked by a shark. Folkard, age 44, was out beyond the breakers at Redhead Beach when a three-meter bull shark lunged for his board, knocking him to the water and dragging him beneath the surface locked in its powerful jaws. AFP PHOTO / Torsten BLACKWOOD

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