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8 Controversial Covers 'The New Yorker' Didn't Publish (PHOTOS)

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The New Yorker is as famous for its smart, cheeky illustrations as it is for its social commentary. The magazine has published commendable images, such as the striking all-black cover after September 11 and Christoph Neimann's subtle "Dark Spring" cover to honor Japan after the 2011 Japanese earthquake.

But the publication is known for taking risks, and some illustrations have been bemoaned by the public, such as Barry Blitt's satirization of misinformation about the Obamas. The image of Barack and Michelle fist-bumping while burning an American flag did not sit well with many readers.

Even though The New Yorker is unafraid of making bold statements, some artwork has been deemed inappropriate or simply didn't make the cut. Here are a few previously unpublished illustrations courtesy of "Blown Covers: New Yorker Covers You Were Never Meant To See" [Abrams, $24.95] by Françoise Mouly.

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