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Bo Xilai Scandal: In Rise And Fall, An Arc Of Ruthlessness

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A Chinese traffic policeman mans the junction to the Communist Party provincial headoffice in Chongqing on March 15, 2012, the office of Bo Xilai, until now a rising political star known for busting gangs and reviving Maoist ideals.  (STR/AFP/Getty Images)
A Chinese traffic policeman mans the junction to the Communist Party provincial headoffice in Chongqing on March 15, 2012, the office of Bo Xilai, until now a rising political star known for busting gangs and reviving Maoist ideals. (STR/AFP/Getty Images)

BEIJING -- "News 1+1" is a sort of Chinese "60 Minutes," a newsmagazine on state-run China Central Television that explores -- as much as the censors permit -- the more contentious corners of Chinese society. In December 2009, the program took aim at a much-publicized anticorruption campaign in the metropolis of Chongqing, a crusade that had grabbed national attention for its sweep, but raised deep concerns about its brutality and disregard for the law.

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