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James Cameron, 'Avatar' Director: 'I'm In The 'Avatar' Business'

The Huffington Post  |  By Posted: 05/07/2012 8:36 am Updated: 05/07/2012 8:38 am

James Cameron Avatar

Great news for "Avatar" fans, but not for those hoping to see director James Cameron's take on romantic comedies. The Oscar-winning King of the World told the New York Times that he's only in "the 'Avatar' business" now.

"I’m making 'Avatar 2,' 'Avatar 3,' maybe 'Avatar 4,'" Cameron revealed during an interview about the Chinese film industry. "I’m not going to produce other people’s movies for them. I’m not interested in taking scripts."

While Cameron admitted that the all-"Avatar," all-the-time career arc might seem a "bit restricted," he says the films allow him to say "everything" he needs to say about "the state of the world." He'll also continue to produce documentaries.

While the comments might seem surprising, looking at Cameron's resume tells you they aren't. The director has released just two feature films since 1997 ("Titanic" and "Avatar"), and a handful documentaries ("Aliens of the Deep," "Ghosts of the Abyss," "Expedition: Bismark," "Titanic: The Final World with James Cameron"). As a producer, Cameron has been slightly more active; beyond his own films, he's also handled Steven Soderbergh's "Solaris" in 2002 and the underwater cave dive adventure "Sanctum" in 2011. (Additionally, his tireless work extolling the virtues of 3D filmmaking has convinced some heavyweight Hollywood directors like Martin Scorsese and Michael Bay to use the format in new and exciting ways.)

As for the "Avatar" sequels, don't hold your breath waiting for them to arrive. Producer Jon Landau said recently that "Avatar 2" might not hit theaters until 2016; the film was initially set for a 2014 release.

For more on Cameron, including his thoughts on the state of the Chinese film industry, head over the the Times website.

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  • This February 2012 file photo provided by National Geographic, shows explorer and filmmaker James Cameron emerging from the hatch of DEEPSEA CHALLENGER during testing of the submersible in Jervis Bay, south of Sydney, Australia. Cameron on Sunday, March 25, 2012 began his journey to someplace only two men have gone before �-- to the Earth's deepest point. The director of "Titanic," ''Avatar" and other films is using the specially designed submarine to descend nearly seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, an area 200 miles (320 kilometers) southwest of the Pacific island of Guam. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen, File)

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron gets a handshake from ocean explorer and U.S. Navy Capt. Don Walsh, right, just before the hatch on the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible is closed and the voyage to the deepest part of the ocean begins, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Walsh took the same journey to the bottom of the Mariana Trench 52 years ago in the bathyscaphe Trieste with Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard. Cameron is the first person to complete the dive solo. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible carrying filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron is hoisted into the Pacific Ocean on its way to the "Challenger Deep," the deepest part of the Mariana Trench, Sunday, March 25, 2012. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • This February 2012 handout photo provided by National Geographic shows the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible begining its first test dive off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Earth's lost frontier, the deepest part of the oceans where the pressure is like three SUVs sitting on your little tow, is about to be explored first-hand. It's been more than half a century since man dared to plunge that deep. Earth's lost frontier is about to be explored firsthand after more than half a century. It's a mission to the deepest part of the ocean, so deep that the pressure is the equivalent of three SUVs sitting on your toe. And it's being launched by the rich and famous. In the next several days, James Cameron, the director of �"Titanic,�" �"Avatar�" and �"The Abyss,�" plans to dive nearly 7 miles deep in a one-man sub he helped design. The location is the Mariana Trench in the South Pacific. �"It's the last frontier for science and exploration on this planet,�" Cameron said. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, National Geographic)

  • In an image provided by National Geographic filmmaker James Cameron gives two thumbs-up as he emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible Monday March 26, 2012 after his successful solo dive in the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)

  • Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible after his successful solo dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean, Monday March 26, 2011. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic) ONE TIME USE

  • In a photo provided by National Geographic filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron holds the National Geographic Society flag after he successfully completed the first ever solo dive to the Mariana Trench Monday March 26, 2012. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)

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