Red wine has long been a controversial libation (and not because of cabernet versus malbec battles). Scientists have gone back and forth over the years about red wine's benefits; specifically whether or not resveratrol, a plant compound found in the drink, has anti-aging powers.

But a recent study published in the journal Cell Metabolism found resveratrol does “prolong lifespan,” overturning a 2010 National Institute of Aging report.

Researchers at the National Institute of Health and the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research found that resveratrol’s anti-aging properties are only expressed when a specific gene, SIRT1, is present, i09 reports. Mice bred without the SIRT1 gene were not affected by the compound. But The Los Angeles Times reports:

"...those that had the gene responded to Resveratrol with improved vascular and metabolic function, reduced inflammation and overall, cells that use fuel and clean up waste more efficiently."

The discovery may speed up the use of resveratrol in an anti-aging drug; previous attempts were cut short because of the 2010 NIA report. We’ll drink to that -- and to these nine other anti-aging strategies.

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  • Exercise

    Exercising does more than improve your exterior. Several studies have found <a href="http://well.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/01/27/phys-ed-how-exercising-keeps-your-cells-young/" target="_hplink">an active lifestyle keeps your cells young</a>, according to <em>The New York Times.</em>

  • Eat Carrots, Pumpkin and Squash

    These orange veggies are chock full of the phytonutrient alpha-carotene, which <a href="http://www.latimes.com/health/boostershots/la-heb-alpha-carotene-112310,0,2855017.story" target="_hplink">lowered the risk of dying from cancer and cardiovascular diseases</a> in a study, according to <em>The Los Angeles Times</em>.

  • Avoid Too Much Sun

    Sun worshippers, take heed: Between <a href="http://www.who.int/uv/faq/skincancer/en/index1.html" target="_hplink">two and three million people are diagnosed with skin cancer</a> globally each year, according to the World Health Organization. With May being Skin Cancer Awareness Month, <a href="http://www.thirdage.com/skin/skin-cancer-awareness-month">Third Age has tips on how to avoid the "potentially fatal cancer."</a>

  • Have Sex

    A ring-a-ding-ding! Dr. Braverman of <em>The Doctors</em> suggests <a href="http://www.thedoctorstv.com/main/content/Anti_Aging" target="_hplink">having sex at least two times a week to help "reboot the brain</a>."

  • Take Your Omega-3s

    Studies suggest that foods rich in this fatty acid may reduce your risk of Alzheimer's.

  • The Computer-Exercise Combo

    <em>Huff/Post50</em> recently reported on a study that had subjects <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2012/05/01/preventing-memory-loss_n_1465789.html?ref=fifty&ir=Fifty&just_reloaded=1">do moderate exercise and use a computer, which resulted in increased memory function</a>.

  • Up Your Glutathione Intake

    <a href="http://communities.washingtontimes.com/neighborhood/quality-life-concierge/2012/apr/16/glutathione-anti-aging-machine/">Glutathione is a rock-star antioxidant found in the body's cells</a> that "neutralizes harmful free radicals," and keeps cells running smoothly, <a href="http://www.webmd.com/food-recipes/features/glutathione-new-supplement-on-block" target="_hplink">according to WebMD</a>. To attain these benefits, eat a diet loaded with fruits and vegetables.

  • Own A Pet

    While there are conflicting reports on whether or not pets will add years to your life, it is confirmed that <a href="http://newoldage.blogs.nytimes.com/2012/03/30/rethinking-the-value-of-pets/" target="_hplink">pets can ease stress and lower blood pressure</a>, <em>The New York Times</em> reports.

  • Limit Sugar Intake

    A spoonful of sugar may make the medicine go down, but it also "<a href="http://www.ucsf.edu/news/2012/02/11437/societal-control-sugar-essential-ease-public-health-burden" target="_hplink">changes metabolism, raises blood pressure, critically alters the signaling of hormones and causes significant damage to the liver</a>," according to three doctors at the University of California at San Francisco. In a <a href="http://www.nature.com/nature/journal/v482/n7383/full/482027a.html" target="_hplink">recent issue of Nature</a>, they argued that the health hazards of sugar are similar to those related to drinking too much alcohol.