High-Paying Jobs That Don't Require A Bachelor's Degree: Report

05/17/2012 05:33 pm ET | Updated Jul 13, 2012

It is a truth universally acknowledged, that you can still make a boatload of money without a bachelor's degree.

You don't even have to be Mark Zukerberg or Steve Jobs or whoever. There are plenty of relatively high-paying jobs that don’t require a bachelor's degree, according to a recent survey by jobs site CareerCast. Yes, yes, the careers may still require other forms of education and certain job skills, but considering a weak job market, and the possibility of high levels of student debt post-college, opting out of higher education doesn't always spell financial doom.

Just take dental hygienists, web developers and online advertising managers. Those jobs feature average salaries of more than $50,000 and often don't require a full bachelor's degree, CareerCast reports. Similar studies show that commercial airline pilots, nuclear power plant operators and landscape architects can pull in some big bucks without a bachelor's degree too.

In recent years, college and high school graduates alike have struggled in the weak job market. Indeed, the share of those with college and advanced degrees that have been jobless for more than a year is roughly the same as that of high school dropouts, according to a recent report.

Still, the long-term benefits of a college degree remain hard to deny. On average, college graduates make more than one million dollars more over their lifetimes than those with only a high school diploma, a Georgetown University report recently found.

Here are ten high-paying jobs that don't require a bachelor's degree:

High-Paying Jobs That Don't Require A Bachelor's Degree

Clarification: CareerCast informs us that they use the U.S. Census Bureau definition of "college graduate" as the holder of a bachelor's, and not an associate's, degree, and treats the terms as interchangeable. CareerCast also told HuffPost, "Very few states require a Dental Hygienist to be a 'college graduate.' Rather, roughly half of all states require a minimum of an 'associate's degree.'" Language has been added to the post to emphasize that the term "college degree" here indicates a bachelor's degree.

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