Join our discussions below about "The Night Circus." Here's who you'll be hearing from...

Andrew Losowsky, Books Editor
I'm British, so anything you think I've spelled wrong, is actually just spelled older. I look for stories to take my brain into new spaces, and I'll be particularly discussing the facts as we think we know them, and the clues I think we're being given by the story. Let me know if you think I'm wrong! I'll also be choosing a few facts to use as jumping-off points for tangential discussions.

Zoë Triska, Associate Books Editor
I was a Literature major so I can't help analyzing every single thing (from the syntax and language to metaphors, similes, you name it). I (reluctantly) admit that I'm one of those people who Googles phrases, places, names every couple of pages when I'm reading. There are constantly things that stump me, though so I'd love to hear your thoughts on the significance of words, places, phrases, events that take place in the book.

Madeleine Crum, Assistant Books Editor
I like looking at language particularities, but in case you think that's a snooze (you wouldn't be alone), I'm also interested in reading what critics say about books and whether their reviews are spot on or way off. Let's talk about it.

Annemarie Dooling, Community Editor
Quotes, locations and descriptions speak to me the same way characters do. I love dissecting the same details that tell us more about the story than the actual prose. If you read the same books over and over and over again the same way you visit an out-of-town friend, we're going to get along just fine.

Here's our reading schedule:
May 27: Pages 1-64, or beginning through Condolences
June 3: 65-141, or The Contortionist's Tattoo through Atmosphere
June 10: 142-205, or Reveurs through Ailuromancy
June 17: 206-266, or Tete-a-Tete through Stormy Seas
June 24: 267-328, or An Entreaty through Precognition
July 1: 329 and on, or Pursuit through the end.

If you'd like to blog your experiences, or join the discussion, leave a comment below and let us know what you think about "The Night Circus."

live blog

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To sum-up our reading of The Night Circus, we'll be giving away 5 copies of the book signed by Erin Morgenstern, as well as a special edition tarot card designed by Erin herself.

To win a copy, leave us a comment below, or tweet to @huffpostbooks at #hpbookclub and give us your best one-sentence summary of The Night Circus. If you haven't read the book yet, get creative and let us know what you think the book is about. After we pick our five favorite replies, we will contact readers to coordinate their prize.

So, let's hear it: In one sentence, what is The Night Circus about?

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On Tuesday we celebrated the end of our reading of The Night Circus and the release of the paperbook version of the book. Between the tarot card read, the caramel popcorn and the amazing musical performance, we're not sure what we loved the most.

If you couldn't get to Boston in time for the circus, we've got video of the performances and Erin Morgenstern's wise words on magic, National Novel Writing Month and her next book coming up shortly, as well as a chance for you to win a signed copy of The Night Circus plus a tarot card designed by Erin.

In the meantime, check out all of the live tweets from the event here.

diptic

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@ armyoftoys : RT @HuffPostBooks: @WalterSickert & The @ArmyofToys is gearing up! #hpbookclub #nightcircus http://t.co/lxGyrTPU

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@ elisir : RT @TravelingAnna: "I found my writing voice when I stopped trying to sound like anyone else." -Erin Morgenstern #HPbookclub

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@ bookoisseur : The only words to describe #TheNightCircus: bookporn realized and luscious. Thanks for the rec @HuffPostBooks! I want another!

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Two great crafts we found this weekend



Source: via Becca on Pinterest

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So, maybe I am wrong. It isn't a book about love or a book about magic. Perhaps, The Night Circus is a book about memories and shadows; weaving between the cracks in your mind to pull up other memories, other moments of brilliance.

Tara Newman, HuffPost Books community member, writes beautifully about her experience reading The Night Circus.

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If you've been salivating while reading The Night Circus, here are some tips on creating your own desserts straight out of the book.

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@ rball3 : Decadent RT @HuffPostBooks: What's one word you'd use to describe 'The Night Circus?' #hpbookclub

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"I love it when books and real life meet."

HuffPost social media editor Mia Aquino finally gave in and joined a book club - ours! She wrote about her first experience, as well as the serendipitous events that occurred after she started reading. Read her whole entry here.

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Happy Sunday, readers. We've reached our last chapter review for "The Night Circus" and you might have noticed that we're already looking for our next book selection. But that doesn't mean we've finished with Erin Morgenstern's NaNoWriMo book completely.

This week we'll be publishing a few reviews from our readers, and on July 3rd we'll be in Boston celebrating with Erin and many other "Night Circus" fans. If you're in the neighborhood, please drop by! And if you missed the post with all the information, click here. We'll be collecting your questions and thoughts through Tuesday evening. Send yours by commenting below or sending us a tweet.

Back to our reading, little Bailey, whose fate we have been debating since our first discussion, has become the center of the story. Not only has his own fate intertwined with Widget and Poppet, but with the circus itself: he's destined to be a part of the event, but what kind of part exactly, we all wonder.

Click here to read some spoilers and thoughts on the end of the book.

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As we near the end of The Night Circus, we're looking forward to our next HuffPost Book Club reading selection. We've done a handful of new books, both fiction and biography, and now we'd like to take a spin back in time. That's right, we're looking at classics.

All four of your Huffington Post Books editors have picked a favorite classic they want to read again with the Book Club community. Hear our pleas below then take our poll and leave a comment letting us know which book you'd like to read. Voting will close on Wednesday, July 4.

Click here to vote!

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@ emily_gruenke : Was behind in #HPBookClub three short days ago, but now is all caught up! Loved #TheNightCircus and can't wait for the next selection!

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HuffPost Books is proud to announce the next Book Club event, in partnership with Random House and Brookline Booksmith. Join us in Boston on July 3rd, 2012 at 5pm for a "Night Circus" celebration with author Erin Morgenstern.

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Wear your best reveur costume for the Night Circus Costume Contest and be prepared to see the circus come to life with a cast of amazing characters like magic and fortune telling by the Urban Circus, and music and mischief by the fantastic Walter Sickert & The Army of Broken Toys! We'll be doing a Q&A with Erin and taking comments and questions from our readers throughout the whole week.

HuffPost Book Club readers following along at home will have the chance to win a signed paperback copy of the book, along with a limited edition tarot card designed by Erin Morgenstern herself. This entire week we'll be sharing tips on hosting your own midnight dinner, our closing thoughts on the book and we'll tell you how you can taste those delicious little chocolate mice that Bailey loved so much right in your own home.

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We put together a list of the one word you think of when you think of 'The Night Circus' on Twitter and put that together with the most used words in the comments of the discussion page, and here's what you said:

the night circus

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@ ChiefAaron : @HuffPostBooks Magical. Cliche or not, it’s simply the most accurate.

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When I explain "The Night Circus" to friends who haven't read it, it's difficult to describe without making it sound like a rip-off of "The Hunger Games."

Two talented, introverted teenagers are unwillingly committed to a battle to the death, but end up falling in love?

Of course, the books are very different: "The Hunger Games" is a commentary on media and social class, whereas "The Night Circus" reads more like a character study wherein the lavish scenery is to be admired rather than frowned upon. Perhaps more notably, Morgenstern says her book isn't meant for Young Adults, even though the two main characters are young and the story is fast-paced.

So what defines a Young Adult book, if featuring young protagonists isn't enough of a qualifier? Must a story be plot-driven? Does it have to read more like genre fiction? Should it exclude difficult language and literary references that may be more difficult for teens to digest?

"The New York Times" complied a handful of opinion pieces on the YA phenomenon that could help answer these questions.

Let us know what YOU think the difference is between YA and literary fiction, and which category "The Night Circus" belongs to.

-Maddie Crum, Assistant Books Editor

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Hi everyone! Maddie here to discuss the next portion of "The Night Circus." I hope you're enjoying it!

As the book nears its climax, the chapters seem more fragmented and the plot is speeding up. Do you find the pacing to be exciting or difficult to follow?

As Bailey is tending to his sheep, Poppet greets him with a difficult proposition: She says that if he does not join the circus, it will be in grave danger. Although it seems fine from the outside, there is something wrong, Poppet asserts. She hands Bailey a bottle with the scent of his favorite tree, in case he chooses to leave, and the two finally engage in a much-anticipated kiss.

How do you think Celia and Marco will resolve their predicament?

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@ SocialMia : I love my Kindle, but it is nice to hold an actual BOOK again. The Night Circus is amazing #hpbookclub @HuffPostBooks http://t.co/fncPZV74

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Hi, y'all. Zoë here. This is my second time around reading "The Night Circus." I enjoyed the book so much that I interviewed Erin Morgenstern after reading it last year…I also finished this book in about two days (I don't know how anyone couldn't. I just HAD to keep reading until I finished it!)

The second time around, I'm also very much enjoying it. I think it is such a fun, intriguing book.

Today, I'll be discussing pages 206-266, or "Tete-a-Tete" through "Stormy Seas"

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So let's see if this works. As part of our continual evolution of the Book Club, I've decided to make public my highlights and notes as I read 'The Night Circus' as an ebook. The ones I'm selecting are those that I think are particularly well written.

You can follow along via Findings.

What are your favorite passages so far?

-- Andrew Losowsky, Books Editor

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First of all, I'd like to express disappointment in my colleagues for getting their French accents right during these discussions. They're just not trying.

OK, that's all I can say spoiler free, so the rest will take place below the jump.

-- Andrew, HuffPost Books Editor

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What would it be?

@ bookandbiscuit : @HuffPostBooks an underwater world complete with mermaids, shipwrecks etc and no need for breathing apparatus.

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@ ddimeglio : @HuffPostBooks I'm maybe the only one I know who DIDNT like The Night Circus #hpbookclub

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