We love TV, but that doesn't mean we love everyone on TV. Some of our favorite shows have a truly horrible character or two. We suffer them in pseudo-silence (yes, there's the random Twitter rant here and there), but the recent house-cleaning at love-to-hate-watch-it "Smash" made us realize: If we don't complain, how can these bad characters ever get better?

So we've rounded up a list of the 21 worst characters on television today. Whether it's a bad accent (ahem, Declan from "Revenge"), a bad attitude (come on, Christina Aguilera, you make too much money to scowl through "The Voice") or just poorly written characters that we're sure the offending actors have done their best with (we don't want to hate Krysten Ritter's Chloe on "Don't Trust the B---- in Apt. 23" ... but we do), we didn't pull any punches when putting together this list. We even have one more suggestion for "Smash's" firing to-do list.

Did your least favorites make the cut? Which offensive characters did we forget? Share your own no-good nominees in the comments.

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  • Leo (Emory Cohen), "Smash"

    "Smash" is getting rid of a lot of baggage for Season 2 ... but why stop there? Julia's son Leo (he of the pot-smoking, arrest and bemoaning his lack of an adopted little sister) has got to go.

  • Betty Draper Francis (January Jones), "Mad Men"

    We're not buying that Betty brings us a critique of the restrictions placed on mid-century housewives or a compelling commentary on the changing nature of gender roles. Don't get us wrong, those are interesting topics, but her unchanging narcissism and her selfish petulance simply bore us to tears.

  • Lori Grimes (Sarah Wayne Callies), "The Walking Dead"

    A brief recap of Lori's two seasons of "The Walking Dead": "Keep an eye on Carl. Have you seen Carl? Shane's crazy, kill him. How could you kill Shane?" Need we go on?

  • Ricky Gervais, "Life's Too Short"

    Gervais used to be funny, but the version of himself on this HBO show -- and everything else about the show -- proves that he's far too enamored of his withered comedic skills (and very unaware of how much they've deteriorated). That eternal smirk he wears has worn out its welcome.

  • Mrs. Bates (Maria Doyle Kennedy), "Downton Abbey"

    In a season far too overstuffed with silly melodramatic events and stereotypical characters, the shrill, greedy first Mrs. Bates stood out. She was one of many eyeroll-inducing characters awkwardly inserted into the period drama, and she was such a cackling, one-dimensional villain that they might as well have given her a mustache to twirl.

  • Chloe (Krysten Ritter), "Don't Trust The B---- In Apt. 23"

    Considering Chloe is the eponymous "B---- in Apt. 23," it's no surprise that she's a huge pain in the ass. This New York City party girl is a con artist who spends most of her time talking about herself, drinking and ruining the lives of those she "loves" (including her BFF James Van Der Beek). Her behavior is horrific. In one instance, she <strike>wanted</strike> needed a personal assistant so she took in a foster child. And then, to make rent, she sold videos of her roommate baking to a sexual fetish site. And you thought your roommate was bad.

  • Christina Aguilera, "The Voice"

    A picture is worth 1,000 words, and there were a lot of awful pictures of Christina from this season of "The Voice." Always (too) outspoken, often pantsless and working some of the most bizarre accessories -- she definitely gives us something to talk about, doesn't she?

  • Zach (Graham Phillips) and Grace Florrick (Makenzie Vega), "The Good Wife"

    We understand the purpose of the Florrick children (grounding Alicia, giving Julianna Margulies material to win Emmys with), but when these characters are on their own fixing computers or "going missing" (getting baptized), they're terrible. Boarding school is calling.

  • Lemon (Jaime King), "Hart of Dixie"

    Every teen soap/medical drama needs a female antagonist, and Zoe Hart has Lemon. Unfortunately, Lemon isn't really fun to hate or root for and no amount of Southern accent, flowery dresses or affairs can change that. Boring.

  • Ben (Ryan Johnson), "Fairly Legal"

    Ben may be Kate's partner at Reed & Reed, but he certainly doesn't play the part of the supportive, friendly business equal. A former "ambulance chaser," Ben's main loves (and motivators) are victory and, of course, cold hard cash. His abrasive personality clashes with protagonist Kate ... might as well call their firm Love & Hate.

  • Lily Tucker Pritchett (Aubrey Anderson-Emmons), "Modern Family"

    Lily in Seasons 1 and 2 -- portrayed by infant twins Jayden and Ella Hiller -- was always a highlight. But in Season 3, "Modern Family" replaced the actresses portraying Cam and Mitchell's adopted Vietnamese daughter with an older little lady. Sure, Lily No. 1 didn't talk, but she didn't need to -- she was just plain adorable. Now, Lily No. 2 has lines that we wish we didn't have to hear.

  • Daisy (Carla Gallo), "Bones"

    A recurring character since Season 4, Daisy is a lab assistant who idolizes Bones. You know the type: sycophantic, irritating and clueless about social interaction. Hands down one of the most annoying characters in prime time, she talks incessantly and doesn't understand the concept of personal space. She's been fired from the lab twice and went on a year-long anthropological dig, but she always manages to return to the show. Stop the madness!

  • Julian (Chris Diamantopoulos), "Up All Night"

    The accent, the ridiculous wardrobe, the general sliminess ... Julian wouldn't have made the cut as a two-minute "SNL" sketch, so why did he stick around "Up All Night" for so long?

  • Shane Walsh (Jon Bernthal), "The Walking Dead"

    It's tough to root for the self-appointed leader of a group of people being constantly chased by zombies when he's an irrational, hot-headed jerk. Shane's leadership throughout Season 2 of "The Walking Dead" was pretty much a trainwreck, as he grew insanely jealous of Rick and Lori's relationship, murdered Otis and tried to kill Rick, too. Fortunately, Rick saw the betrayal coming and stabbed Shane in the heart. Viewers got an extra treat when he returned briefly as a walker and was quickly put down by Carl.

  • Charlotte Grayson (Christa B. Allen), "Revenge"

    We're supposed to feel bad for Charlotte of "Revenge": She found out her dad isn't her dad (her real one is dead and her fake one might be the only actor on the show worse than she is), her mom basically hates her, she broke up with her equally annoying boyfriend (see: Declan, also on our list) after he betrayed her in her brother's murder trial and she's poppin' pills left and right. Despite all that, it's hard to care about Charlotte's downward spiral because she's just so damn annoying. (<strong>Spoiler alert</strong>: Did we get our wish in the <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/crystal-bell/revenge-finale-recap-victoria-dead_b_1541233.html" target="_hplink">Season 1 finale</a>?)

  • Margaret Schroeder (Kelly Macdonald), "Boardwalk Empire"

    There's nothing more irritating than TV characters who can't make up their mind about who they want to be. Margaret Schroeder knew all along what Nucky had done to her abusive first husband, and took his money and enjoyed her new house and lavish lifestyle anyway. Then, at the end of the season, struggling with her overbearing Catholic guilt, she cheated on Nucky with his bodyguard and secretly donated his land holdings to the church. Will she meet the same fate as the other characters who crossed Nucky last season? Probably not, but we can hope.

  • Whitney (Whitney Cummings), "Whitney"

    Shouldn't the star of a sitcom be fun to watch ... at least kind of? Whitney just doesn't bring it. Her character is shrill and unlikeable -- can she really carry a second season?!

  • Steve Evans (Steven Strait), "Magic City"

    He may be charming, but Stevie's "bad boy" persona gets old -- especially when he takes his dad's slimy advice on how to woo the women of 1950s Florida.

  • Luke Granby (Steven Pasquale), "Up All Night"

    When Reagan and Ava's talk show was taken over by their business idol Yvonne, she brought in her right-hand man Luke to run the show on a day-to-day basis. Unfortunately, Luke is an insufferable wannabe alpha-male who works at a standing desk and makes everyone's lives harder for no apparent reason. He got slightly less irritating throughout the season, but the show could never figure out a way to get him out of the leading ladies' way. <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/10/do-no-harm-infamous-nbc_n_1507532.html" target="_hplink">NBC cast Steven Pasquale as the lead in its upcoming series "Do No Harm,"</a> so hopefully we've seen the last of this impossibly annoying character.

  • Sugar Motta (Vanessa Lengies), "Glee"

    Not only does Sugar try to bring New Directions down, but she blames her heartless behavior on self-diagnosed Asperger syndrome. How low can you go?

  • Declan Porter (Connor Paolo), "Revenge"

    Oh Declan ... so moody, so disposable, such a horribly unnecessary Boston accent for someone who's from Montauk. We'd fully support a "Declan and Yonkers girl elope and never return" storyline on "Revenge." Just sayin'.

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