MOSCOW -- Russia's lower house of parliament approved a bill Tuesday that would raise the fine for participating in an unauthorized protest 150-fold.

If, as expected, the bill becomes law, protesters whose rallies aren't officially sanctioned will face fines of up to 300,000 rubles ($9,000), up from the current 2,000 ($60).

The potential punishment is far more severe than for many other crimes.

A sampling of other offenses and their maximum penalties under Russian law:

_ Prostitution: A fine of 2,500 rubles ($75).

_ Illegal use of an automobile: 120,000 rubles ($3,600).

_ Nuclear materials storage violations: 5,000 rubles ($150) for regular citizens, 40,000 ($1,200) for public officials.

_ Performing an abortion without medical qualification: 80,000 rubles ($2,400).

_ Violating safety precautions in designing, building and using nuclear energy facilities that could cause danger or radioactive contagion: 200,000 rubles ($6,000).

_ Organizing prostitution: 500,000 rubles ($15,000) or three years in prison.

Earlier on HuffPost:

Loading Slideshow...
  • Protesters try to block the street in downtown near the opposition camp in Moscow, late Wednesday, May 17, 2012. Russian police uprooted a protest camp in central Moscow that has become a center of opposition activity, rousting demonstrators in an early morning raid Wednesday hours before a deadline to leave. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

  • Police officers detain a protester, with Opposition leader Ilya Yashin, foreground second left, in the opposition camp in Moscow, Thursday, May 17, 2012. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

  • Police officers try to disperse protesters in the opposition camp in Moscow, late Wednesday, May 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

  • Police officers disperse protesters in the opposition camp in Moscow, late Wednesday, May 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Sergey Ponomarev)

  • Russian youth opposition protesters, evicted by police from a protest camp at Chistiye Prudy, relax at a new site chosen for their camp in downtown Moscow, Wednesday, May 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)

  • Russian youth opposition protesters, evicted by police from a protest camp at Chistiye Prudy, relax at a new site chosen for their camp in downtown Moscow, Wednesday, May 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)

  • Russian youth opposition protesters, evicted by police from a protest camp at Chistiye Prudy, relax at a new site chosen for their camp in downtown Moscow, Wednesday, May 16, 2012. (AP Photo/Misha Japaridze)

  • Two opposition followers with a white ribbon, as a symbol of protest, rest at the site of one of 7 sky-scrapers built by Soviet dictator Josef Stalin after they were disperse by police from the park around Chistiye Prudy, or Clear Ponds, in Moscow, Wednesday, May 16, 2012. (AP Photo /Alexander Zemlianichenko)