Huffpost Politics

Margaret Spellings Opens Up Why She Left Mitt Romney Campaign Over Federal Education Role

Posted: Updated:
MARGARET SPELLINGS MITT ROMNEY CAMPAIGN
Mitt Romney's views about the federal role in education matters resulted in the departure of an adviser for his campaign, former Education Secretary Margaret Spellings. | AP

Former President George W. Bush's education secretary, Margaret Spellings, has disclosed to a New York Times reporter why she has discontinued her role as an education adviser to candidate Mitt Romney's campaign.

"I have long supported and defended and believe in a muscular federal role on school accountability," she told The New York Times in an article published on Monday. "Vouchers and choice as the drivers of accountability; obviously that’s untried and untested."

In May, The Huffington Post's Joy Resmovits reported that Spellings chose not to remain with the campaign because of differences over federal accountability in enforcing the No Child Left Behind Act but that she still supports Romney.

Following her departure from her advisory role in late May, Spellings, an education policy strategist for the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, told EdWeek that Romney was "one of the best governors in the country on education." The Romney campaign listed her as an adviser in early March.

The Times reported that Romney never uses the hot-button word "voucher" to describe his education plan but would allow students to use federal funds to attend any school they choose.

Romney envisions a smaller federal role than what was envisioned by Bush in connection to the No Child Left Behind Act, which requires public schools to administer standardized tests. Romney advisers said he generally supports the law but would "replace federally mandated school interventions with a requirement that creates straightforward public report cards."

Also on HuffPost:

Suggest a correction

Around the Web

Margaret Spellings Joins Apollo Group Board of Directors

In Romney's education policy, a return to GOP roots

The Romney Education Plan: Replacing Federal Overreach on Accountability With ...

OVERNIGHT MONEY: Boehner back in the spotlight for another policy speech

 
  Obama Romney
Obama Romney
332 206
Obama leading
Obama won
Romney leading
Romney won
Popular Vote
33 out of 100 seats are up for election. 51 are needed for a majority.
Democrat leading
Democrat won
Holdover
Republican leading
Republican won
Democrats* Republicans
Current Senate 53 47
Seats gained or lost +2 -2
New Total 55 45
* Includes two independent senators expected to caucus with the Democrats: Angus King (Maine) and Sen. Bernie Sanders (Vt.).
All 435 seats are up for election. 218 are needed for a majority.
Democrat leading
Democrat won
Republican leading
Republican won
Democrats Republicans
Seats won 201 234
Click for Full Results