"5 Held in Plot to Bug Democrats' Office Here." That's how the Washington Post's reporting on Watergate began. 40 years later, it is still legendary.

Nothing, it seems, can diminish the legacy of Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's dogged pursuit of the scandal that brought Richard Nixon down. Even after people have argued that the reporting didn't have much of an impact at the time, or have raised questions about the authenticity of some of the details in "All The President's Men," Watergate endures, the crowning achievement and eternal touchstone for the Post.

On Monday, Woodward, Bernstein, Ben Bradlee and a whole host of Post and media luminaries gathered at --where else?--the Watergate hotel in Washington to reflect on its legacy. The Post also created a special section on its website to mark the occasion, along with a lengthy piece by Woodward and Bernstein about the scandal.

In a web video, the major players held forth on what it was like back then.

From Bernstein: "We really covered this like local reporters."

From Tom Brokaw, a White House reporter at the time: "I don't think there's been an event in my lifetime that's had such an impact on journalism," Brokaw said.

From Lesley Stahl, also then a White House correspondent: "There were all these lulls. The story would just disappear. And then Woodward and Bernstein would write another piece and it would flare up."

From Katharine Graham, the Post's iconic publisher, in archival footage: "What we did was a newspaper's defined job, which is to keep a story alive when they were trying to hush it up."

The Post has also put all of the stories from Watergate online for everyone to read.

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  • Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, Charlie Rose

  • Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, Ben Bradlee

    Former Washington Post reporters Carl Bernstein, left, and Bob Woodward, right, stand next to former executive editor Ben Bradlee during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • Bob Woodward, Ben Bradlee

    Former Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward, top, kisses the head of former executive editor Ben Bradlee as Bradlee arrives on stage during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, Ben Bradlee

    Former Washington Post reporters Carl Bernstein, left, and Bob Woodward, right, applaud as former executive editor Ben Bradlee sits on stage during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • Bob Woodward, Carl Bernstein, Charlie Rose

    Moderator Charlie Rose, left, listens as former Washington Post reporters Bob Woodward, and Carl Bernstein, speak during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • William Cohen, William F. Weld,

    William Cohen, left, member of the House Judiciary Committee during Watergate, speaks as William F. Weld, associate minority counsel, House Watergate Committee, listens during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • Audience members watch a video presentation during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • John Dean, Fred Thompson, Richard Ben-Veniste, Timothy Naftali

    Timothy Naftali, left, moderator and former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, John Dean, White House counsel to President Nixon, Fred Thompson, chief minority counsel for the Senate Watergate Committee, and Richard Ben-Veniste, special prosecutor during Watergate speak during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • Ben Bradlee

    Ben Bradlee, former executive editor of The Washington Post, watches a video presentation during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • John Dean, Timothy Naftali

    Timothy Naftali, left, moderator and former director of the Richard Nixon Presidential Library and Museum, listens to John Dean, White House counsel to President Nixon, during an event sponsored by The Washington Post to commemorate the 40th anniversary of Watergate Monday, June 11, 2012 at the Watergate office building in Washington. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)

  • The Watergate complex is seen in Washing

    The Watergate complex is seen in Washington, DC, June 11, 2012. June 17, 2012 marks the 40th anniversary of the infamous Watergate break-in, which brought down the presidency of Richard M. Nixon. Nixon resigned in August 1974 for his administration's role in a June 17, 1972, burglary of the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex in the US capital and the subsequent cover-up. He became the only American president ever to resign the office. Many inaccurate ideas and myths related to Nixon's role in the burglary and its cover-up have found long life over the years, reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, who broke the story, wrote in an op-ed piece The Washington Post Saturday. AFP PHOTO/Jim Watson (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A historical plaque is seen at the Water

    A historical plaque is seen at the Watergate complex in Washington, DC, June 11, 2012. June 17, 2012 marks the 40th anniversary of the infamous Watergate break-in, which brought down the presidency of Richard M. Nixon. Nixon resigned in August 1974 for his administration's role in a June 17, 1972, burglary of the Democratic National Committee headquarters at the Watergate complex in the US capital and the subsequent cover-up. He became the only American president ever to resign the office. Many inaccurate ideas and myths related to Nixon's role in the burglary and its cover-up have found long life over the years, reporters Carl Bernstein and Bob Woodward, who broke the story, wrote in an op-ed piece The Washington Post Saturday. AFP PHOTO/Jim Watson (Photo credit should read JIM WATSON/AFP/GettyImages)

  • A historical marker on August 19, 2011 n

    A historical marker on August 19, 2011 notes the parking garage in the Rosslyn neighborhood of Arlington, Virginia, where Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward met in secret with his source 'Deep Throat' (Senior FBI official Mark Felt) as Woodward investigated former US President Richard Nixon and the Watergate scandal in 1972 and 1973. The scandal ultimately lead to Nixon's resignation in 1974. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

  • A historical note marks parking spot D32

    A historical note marks parking spot D32 on August 19, 2011 in a parking garage in the Rosslyn neighborhood of Arlington, Virginia, where Washington Post reporter Bob Woodward met in secret with his source 'Deep Throat' (Senior FBI official Mark Felt) as Woodward investigated former US President Richard Nixon and the Watergate scandal in 1972 and 1973. The scandal ultimately lead to Nixon's resignation in 1974. AFP PHOTO / Saul LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

  • Woodward And Bernstein's Watergate Papers Go On Display

    AUSTIN, TX - FEBRUARY 4: Reporters Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein's Watergate papers are seen on display at the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at the University of Texas Februrary 4, 2005 in Austin, Texas. More than 75 document boxes of materials created by the reporters while covering Watergate for the Washington Post and research for the books 'All the President's Men' and 'The Final Days' are included in the collection, only a portion of which is on view to the public. Materials include: interviews, memos of phone conversations, story drafts, notes, research documents, correspondence and margin notes. (Photo by Jana Birchum/Getty Images)

  • Magazine Reveals Identity Of Watergate's "Deep Throat"

    SANTA ROSA, CA - MAY 31: Former FBI official W. Mark Felt waves to reporters May 31, 2005 in Santa Rosa, California. An article written in Vanity Fair magazine claims that Felt was ?Deep Throat? the long-anonymous source who leaked secrets about President Nixon?s Watergate cover-up to The Washington Post in the early 1970's. (Photo by Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)