-- The eyewitness testimony that confronted jurors in Jerry Sandusky's child-molestation trial this week was disturbing not only for its graphic descriptions of sex with boys, but for what it said about the people who surrounded and maybe even protected the once-revered Penn State assistant coach.

Eight accusers took the witness stand and described how Sandusky molested them in campus showers, hotel bathrooms, a basement bedroom, a sauna used by the football team – right under the noses of his friends, colleagues, family members and acquaintances.

The Sandusky story, the way authorities have framed it, is one littered with missed chances to stop a rapist who preyed on children for years.

Prosecutors have hinted that top university officials knew far more about Sandusky's alleged proclivities than they have let on, submitting a document Monday that says Penn State's former vice president – himself facing charges related to the scandal – maintained a file on Sandusky a decade ago. A Penn State trustee told The Associated Press he now suspects a cover-up.

Yet evidence and testimony from the trial also show there were plenty of people, not just those at the highest levels of the university, who had ample opportunity to stop a man accused of violating 10 boys over 15 years:

_ A janitor failed to tell authorities he allegedly caught Sandusky performing oral sex on a boy in a campus shower a dozen years ago.

_ A district attorney with a reputation for prosecuting cases involving children and sexual abuse victims declined to charge Sandusky over a 1998 molestation allegation even though the detective who investigated thought it was a solid case. The DA, Ray Gricar, disappeared in 2005 and was declared legally dead last year.

_ School district officials were skeptical of abuse claims brought by the young man known in court papers as Victim 1 because, the accuser testified, Sandusky was considered to have a "heart of gold." Victim 1's allegations eventually triggered the state investigation that produced charges.

_ One accuser testified he screamed out for help at least once when Sandusky's wife, Dottie, was in the house. He doesn't know whether she heard his cries.

_ And, famously, coaching assistant Mike McQueary saw Sandusky having what he believed to be anal sex with a young boy in 2001. But his report to Athletic Director Tim Curley and Vice President Gary Schultz went nowhere. McQueary's dad testified that during a conversation, Schultz said he was suspicious of Sandusky, and NBC reported this week that emails between former university President Graham Spanier and Schultz aiming to keep McQueary's allegation from going further were turned over to the attorney general.

_Others also saw Sandusky engaging in behavior that was at least odd, if not criminal. Longtime assistant coach Tom Bradley walked into the shower when one boy was with Sandusky, the accuser testified, and a wrestling coach told jurors he saw Sandusky and a child rolling on the floor.

_ Several accusers said their parents or caregivers failed to grasp what was happening to them. Victim 4 testified that one weekend he did not want to go with Sandusky and told his mother, "I'm pretty sure he's gay," but she dismissed the idea. "She said, oh, whatever, this is just one of your lies," he told jurors. He also said at one point he told his grandmother to tell Sandusky he wasn't home when he called.

Victim 1 testified that when he asked his mother about "a website for people who do things to children," and she asked why, he said it was "to see if Jerry was on there." He said he didn't think she totally understood. And Victim 9 told jurors he described Sandusky to his mother as "a touchy-feely type of a person," but she pressured him to spend time with the former coach.

Keith Masser, a Penn State trustee, said in an interview that he initially thought the scandal was about a failure of administrative oversight of the football program. Now he suspects it goes deeper.

When the board of trustees ousted Spanier on Nov. 9, four days after Sandusky's arrest, it was "because we didn't have confidence in his ability to lead us through this crisis," Masser said. "We had no idea (at the time) he would be involved in a cover-up."

Masser stressed he was speaking for himself and not the board at large, and said he wants to be careful not to draw premature conclusions. But he said it now appears like "top administration officials and top athletic officials were involved in making the decision to not inform the proper authorities."

With prosecutors focused on the sex-abuse allegations against Sandusky, the trial isn't intended to yield evidence of a possible cover-up. That's the job of Louis Freeh, the former FBI director hired by the board of trustees to investigate the scandal. His report could be released in late summer.

Spanier, who has not been charged with any crime, did not respond to email and phone messages. His attorney did not return a phone call.

The law firm defending Curley and Schultz against charges they lied in their grand jury testimony and failed to report suspect abuse said in a statement this week they "conscientiously considered" McQueary's account and "deliberated about how to responsibly deal with the conduct and handle the situation properly." They did not respond to follow-up questions posed by the AP.

Masser said the Freeh investigation is helping Penn State get to the bottom of the scandal.

"I hope the truth comes out, and from a board standpoint it was Judge Freeh's investigation that found these emails that relate Spanier, Curley and Schultz to the suspected cover-up," he said. "I want the alumni to understand and the stakeholders to understand that this independent investigation is uncovering this information."

Sandusky was charged in November and December with more than 50 counts of abuse. The scandal brought disgrace to Penn State and led to the ousters of both Spanier and Paterno, the Hall of Fame coach who died in January at age 85.

The testimony of eight of the 10 alleged victims named in a grand jury report prompted disgust and revulsion from Penn State alumni and others who took to Twitter last week to express their dismay – and to call for the heads of anyone involved in concealing abuse. "Anyone who knew and didn't report should burn!" tweeted one.

The grim depictions of abuse also hit at least one former player hard.

The accuser known as Victim 4 told jurors that Sandusky let him wear star linebacker LaVar Arrington's jersey and gave him a magazine autographed by the former NFL All-Pro, who played at Penn State in the late 1990s.

Arrington apologized to the man a day after his testimony, writing in The Washington Post that he felt awful for having missed the warning signs.

"He always seemed mad or kind of distant. I remember distinctly asking him: `Why are you always walking around all mad, like a tough guy?'" Arrington wrote. "I guess with everything that I had going on, it certainly wasn't a priority for me to try to figure him out."

Arrington continued, "I hate everything that has happened, and now I must admit I feel even worse, knowing what allegedly was happening so close to me, and that I was unaware."

Ann Tenbrunsel, a professor of business ethics at the University of Notre Dame, attributes the failure to stop Sandusky to a phenomenon she calls "motivated blindness," a tendency, whether subconscious or deliberate or sometimes both, to ignore unethical or even criminal behavior by others when you perceive it to be in your best interest to do so. Motivated blindness "means I don't probe, I don't ask, I don't believe," Tenbrunsel said. "I have evidence in front of me but choose to disregard facts."

Some people could have kept quiet about their suspicions because they wanted to protect Penn State and its beloved – and highly lucrative – football program, or their own jobs, she said. Others might not have wanted to believe the sainted Sandusky capable of the abuse he's now charged with.

"You have all kinds of examples of people who either did not notice, or when they did notice didn't engage in behaviors that would have stopped it because it wasn't in their best interests to do so," said Tenbrunsel, co-author of "Blind Spots," a book that explores why otherwise decent people sometimes fail to do the right thing.

Some of the alleged assaults appear to have been interrupted, if unwittingly. One young man said Sandusky coerced him into engaging in oral sex in a hotel bathroom in Texas around the time of the 1999 Alamo Bowl – Sandusky's last game before retiring – stopping only when the coach's wife entered the hotel room. The same accuser, Victim 4, testified about another occasion in which Bradley was showering in the team headquarters while the alleged victim and Sandusky were behind a curtain in another stall.

"I can't say what (Bradley's) thoughts were, but I think he was suspicious of something because he stayed in the shower until everything was done," the man testified without elaborating.

Bradley did not return several messages from The Associated Press.

A wrestling coach told jurors that he found Victim 1 and Sandusky rolling around on the floor in the high school weight room one evening.

Joseph Miller said that while he found it odd, he gave the famed coach a pass. "It was Jerry. Jerry Sandusky. He's a saint. What he's doing with kids, it's fantastic," Miller recalled thinking. "So I didn't think anything of it."

The trial is scheduled to enter its fifth day Monday as prosecutors near the end of their case. Sandusky denies all the charges, saying that while he showered with boys, he never touched them sexually. His attorney has suggested the accusers are twisting the truth because they intend to sue.

___

Associated Press writers Mark Scolforo and Genaro C. Armas in Bellefonte, Pa., contributed to this report.

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  • Jerry Sandusky

    Role: Former assistant football coach and founder of The Second Mile charity for children, accused of molesting boys over a 15-year period. Background: Arrested in November after a long investigation by a statewide grand jury. He had been a very successful defensive coach for the Nittany Lions for 30 years, and prosecutors say he used his fame in the community to attract victims. Charges: Involuntary deviate sexual intercourse, indecent assault of a young child, unlawful contact with minors, corruption of minors, endangering the welfare of children. Status: Awaits trial, with jury selection scheduled for Tuesday.

  • Dottie Sandusky

    Role: Married to Jerry Sandusky. Background: Dottie Sandusky has stood by her husband, posting his bail, accompanying him to court proceedings and issuing a statement in December that proclaimed his innocence and said accusers were making up stories. She is not charged.

  • Tim Curley

    Role: Penn State athletic director, on leave while he fights criminal charges for actions related to the Sandusky scandal. Background: Curley fielded a complaint about Sandusky in a team shower with a boy in early 2001, and told a grand jury he instructed Sandusky not to be inside Penn State athletic facilities with any young people. Charges: Failure to properly report suspected child abuse and perjury for lying to the grand jury. He's not on trial with Sandusky, denies the allegations and is seeking to have the charges dismissed.

  • Gary Schultz

    Role: Penn State vice president for business and finance, now retired. Background: Schultz told the grand jury that head coach Joe Paterno and assistant Mike McQueary reported the 2001 shower incident "in a very general way" but did not provide details. Charges: Failure to properly report suspected child abuse and perjury for lying to the grand jury. He's not on trial with Sandusky, denies the allegations and is seeking to have the charges dismissed.

  • Mike McQueary

    Role: Assistant Penn State football coach. Was a graduate assistant in 2001, when he says he witnessed Jerry Sandusky and a boy naked together in a team shower. McQueary took his complaint to Paterno, who alerted university administrators. Background: McQueary testified at a court hearing in December that he "believed Jerry was sexually molesting" the boy and "having some type of intercourse with him."

  • Joe Amendola

    Role: Defense attorney for Jerry Sandusky. Background: Amendola has been second-guessed for allowing Sandusky to go on network television and speak at length with a reporter for The New York Times after his arrest. Has won several legal battles for Sandusky, including getting him released on bail and fighting the prosecution's effort to have the case heard by a jury from outside the State College area. His office is in State College.

  • Karl Rominger

    Role: Another defense attorney for Jerry Sandusky. Background: Rominger suggested in media interviews that Sandusky might have been teaching "basic hygiene skills" to some of the youths, such as how to put soap on their bodies. His office is in Carlisle.

  • Joseph McGettigan III

    Role: Lead prosecutor. Background: McGettigan, currently senior deputy attorney general, is a veteran prosecutor with stints in the Philadelphia and Delaware County district attorneys' offices and the U.S. attorney's office. McGettigan prosecuted John du Pont, the chemical fortune heir who killed an Olympic gold medal-winning wrestler at his palatial estate in 1996. He's known as an aggressive, feisty lawyer.

  • John Cleland

    Role: Judge presiding over Sandusky's trial. Background: Cleland is a semi-retired senior judge from McKean County in western Pennsylvania. Known as courteous and fair-minded, Cleland previously chaired a state panel that investigated a nationally reported scandal in Luzerne County involving the trading of juvenile-detention suspects for cash.

  • Joe Paterno

    Role: The longtime football coach was told by McQueary in 2001 that he saw Sandusky and Victim No. 2 in a shower on the Penn State campus and, in turn, told Curley and Schultz. Background: The head coach at Penn State from 1966 through 2011, and major college football's winningest, he offered to resign at the end of the 2011 season amid the uproar after Sandusky's arrest Nov. 6. The Penn State Board of Trustees, however, ousted him for what was called his "failure of leadership" surrounding allegations about Sandusky. He died of lung cancer Jan. 22.

  • Sue Paterno

    Role: Married to Paterno for almost 50 years, she raised five children with him and passionately defended her husband during the scandal and after he died. It's unclear whether she might testify.

  • Tom Corbett

    Role: Now the governor of Pennsylvania, he was attorney general when the investigation into Sandusky was launched by state prosecutors. Background: Corbett is an ex-officio member of the Penn State Board of Trustees, although he did not actively participate until after Sandusky was charged in December.

  • Linda Kelly

    Role: Pennsylvania attorney general, whose office is prosecuting Sandusky. Background: A career prosecutor in the Pittsburgh area, Kelly inherited the Sandusky probe from Corbett when she was confirmed as his temporary successor as attorney general. She leaves office in January.

  • Frank Noonan

    Role: Pennsylvania State Police commissioner. Background: Noonan garnered national attention two days after Sandusky's arrest when he criticized Paterno, a Penn State and sports icon, for failing his "moral responsibility" to do more when McQueary told him of the 2001 shower incident.

  • Jack Raykovitz

    Role: Former CEO of The Second Mile, the charity Jerry Sandusky founded. Background: Raykovitz led the charity for almost 30 years and was a longtime friend of Sandusky's. Raykovitz testified before the grand jury that recommended indicting Sandusky on child abuse charges. He resigned from The Second Mile soon after the scandal broke, and board members later complained that Raykovitz hadn't told them enough about earlier allegations against Sandusky.

*all captions via AP