According to a new report, "Dads Expect Better," conducted by the National Partnership for Women & Families, at least 66 countries guarantee a father’s right to paid paternal leave –- 31 offer 14 weeks or more. The United States is not one of those countries.

Working moms in America are well aware that our laws around maternity leave fall severely short when compared to those of other developed countries. This new report shows that dads, too, are getting the shaft. Under the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), fathers have access to 12 weeks of unpaid leave, but because of restrictions -– for example, businesses that have fewer than 50 employees are exempt from the rule -- only some dads are eligible.

National Partnership president Debra L. Ness wrote in a HuffPost blog that, as a country, "America's families expect and deserve better.” But when the data is broken down, some states do prove to be more progressive than others. According to the new report, 14 states and the District of Columbia have laws in place that benefit both mom and dad, while 18 states implement laws only applicable to moms, and 18 do nothing beyond what federal law requires.

"Studies have shown that dad's involvement is just as important to a child's cognitive and social development as the impact of mom," Dr. Jody Heymann, co-author of "Raising the Global Floor: Dismantling the Myth That We Can’t Afford Good Working Conditions for Everyone," told National Geographic in 2010. Heymann explained that when fathers take time off work when babies are born, children fare better developmentally and mothers are less likely to suffer from depression.

In May, the National Partnership for Women & Families released “Expecting Better: A State-by-State Analysis of Laws That Help New Parents” to break down parental leave laws state by state and document which states could use improvement.

With "Dads Expect Better," the organization highlighted the best states for new working dads. See them below, with text provided by the National Partnership for Women & Families. For methodology and more information, view the full report.

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  • Washington, D.C , 70 Points

    D.C.'s laws include six of seven possible policies to help new fathers and mothers by expanding FMLA access to workers in smaller businesses and those with less time on the job and offering a longer period of FMLA leave. D.C. also enacted the nation's second paid sick leave law.

  • Connecticut, 60 Points

    Connecticut's laws include five of seven possible policies to help new fathers and mothers. Among these policies, Connecticut enacted the nation's first statewide paid sick leave law.

  • New Jersey, 60 Points

    New Jersey created the nation's second family leave insurance program and also provides unpaid, job-protected leave to workers with less time on the job prior to needing leave.

  • California, 55 Points

    California created the nation's first family leave insurance law and permits workers to take unpaid family leave to care for the child of a domestic partner. California also guarantees "flexible" use of sick leave to allow workers who earn sick leave through their employers to use that leave to care for an ill child or spouse.

  • Maine, 45 Points

    Maine's family leave law applies to workers in smaller businesses and allows workers to take leave to care for the child of a domestic partner.

  • Oregon, 45 Points

    Oregon's family leave law applies to workers in smaller businesses and allows workers to take leave to care for the child of a domestic partner.

  • Washington, 45 Points

    Washington has taken the first step toward providing paid leave for new parents, and the state's unpaid family leave law allows workers to take leave to care for the child of a domestic partner. Washington also guarantees "flexible" use of sick leave to allow workers who earn sick leave through their employers to use that leave to care for an ill child or spouse.

  • Hawaii, 35 Points

    Hawaii's family leave law provides unpaid, job-protected leave to workers with less time on the job.

  • Wisconsin, 35 Points

    Wisconsin's family leave law provides unpaid, job-protected leave to workers with less time on the job.

  • Minnesota, 20 Points

    Minnesota's parental leave law provides unpaid, job-protected leave to workers in smaller businesses and those with less time on the job.

  • Vermont, 20 Points

    Vermont's family leave law provides unpaid, job-protected leave to workers in smaller businesses.

  • Maryland, 15 Points

    Maryland law guarantees "flexible" use of sick leave to allow workers who earn sick leave through their employers to use that leave to care for an ill child or spouse.

  • Rhode Island, 10 Points

    Rhode Island's family leave law provides unpaid, job-protected leave to workers with less time on the job.

  • Tennessee, 10 Points

    Tennessee's parental leave law allows new parents to take a longer period of leave than the federal FMLA provides.

  • Kentucky, 10 Points

    Kentucky allows adoptive parents in smaller businesses and with less time on the job to take leave to care for their adopted children.

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