Guests of The Denver Zoo are in for a rare, new site -- a young male Amur leopard cub was recently born at the zoo and is now viewable by the public.

The critically endangered Amur leopard cub named Makar (Mah-car) is the first birth of this species at The Denver Zoo since 1996, according to a Denver Zoo press release.

Since his birth, Makar has been spending a lot of time with his mother, Dazma (Dazz-mah), behind-the-scenes, but just received a clean bill of health from zoo veterinarians and is now viewable in the zoo's Feline Building.

Makar was born to his mother Dazma and father (Hari-Kari (Harry Care-ee). Dazma was born at the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo in 2001 and came to Denver Zoo in 2004, Hari-Kari was born at El Paso Zoo in 2003 and came from there in 2005.

Amur leopards take their name from the Amur region of Asia located along the Chinese-Russian border, according to The Denver Zoo. Although the Amur leopard is currently considered critically endangered and are nearly extinct in the wild, they once flourished throughout the region -- from South Korea to north of China and into southern Russia. Now, less than 40 Amur leopards are estimated to remain in the wild.

Poaching for fur, loss of habitat and trophy hunting are the primary reasons cited for their decline.

When Makar grows up he could reach nearly 120 pounds and measure up to two-and-a-half-feet tall at the shoulder and eight-to-nine feet-long from head to tail, like other males of the species.

LOOK at photos of Makar and other Amur leopards around the world:

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  • Makar, the first Amur Leopard to be born at The Denver Zoo since 1996. photo courtesy of <a href="http://www.denverzoo.org/" target="_hplink">The Denver Zoo</a>.

  • Makar, the first Amur Leopard to be born at The Denver Zoo since 1996. photo courtesy of <a href="http://www.denverzoo.org/" target="_hplink">The Denver Zoo</a>.

  • Makar, the first Amur Leopard to be born at The Denver Zoo since 1996. photo courtesy of <a href="http://www.denverzoo.org/" target="_hplink">The Denver Zoo</a>.

  • Makar, the first Amur Leopard to be born at The Denver Zoo since 1996. photo courtesy of <a href="http://www.denverzoo.org/" target="_hplink">The Denver Zoo</a>.

  • Denver Zoo Welcomes Birth Of Amur Leopard Cub

    via YouTube.

  • An Amur leopard cub is weighed during his first physical at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens, on Thursday, June 14, 2012 in Jacksonville, Fla. Two cubs were born on May 31, 2012, the second litter of 12 year-old Makari. The cubs were weighed, had their temperature taken, and pulse rate measured. (AP Photo/Florida Times-Union, Bruce Lipsky)

  • This image provided by the San Diego Zoo shows Amur leopards Thursday April 12, 2012, at the zoo in San Diego. This is the first time the Zoo has housed this critically endangered species. The trio arrived at the San Diego Zoo as part of an international conservation program aimed at saving one of the world's most endangered cats. Less than 40 Amur leopards have been documented in the wilds of the Primorye region of the Russian Far East.(AP Photo/San Diego Zoo, Ken Bohn)

  • Amur leopards

    Undated photo released Monday Jan. 2, 2012, by Wildlife Heritage Foundation of an Amur leopard, an example of the endangered species which is scheduled to be released in Russia. A batch of Amur leopards from UK zoos could soon be heading to Russia as part of a captive breeding and release programme, it is announced Monday Jan. 2, 2012, as part of a plan to save the big cats from extinction. There are thought to be just 25 to 35 wild Amur leopards left in the Russian Far East region, with numbers driven down by poaching of both the cat and its prey and damage to its habitat from logging and forest fires. (AP Photo / Wildlife Heritage Foundation) EDITORIAL USE ONLY

  • Staff veterinarian Adrienne Atkins checks one of the two Amur leopard cubs during their first physical at the Jacksonville Zoo and Gardens, on Thursday, June 14, 2012 in Jacksonville, Fla. Two cubs were born on May 31, 2012, the second litter of 12 year-old Makari. The cubs were weighed, had their temperature taken, and pulse rate measured. (AP Photo/Florida Times-Union, Bruce Lipsky)

  • A veterinarian of the Mulhouse zoo bottl

    A veterinarian of the Mulhouse zoo bottle-feeds 'Argoun', a one-month-old Amur leopard (Panthera pardus orientalis) on May 16, 2012 at the zoo in Mulhouse, eastern France. Amur leopards population is estimated to about fifty in nature around the world. AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON (Photo credit should read SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/GettyImages)

  • "Kathanga", a four-month-old Amur leopar

    'Kathanga', a four-month-old Amur leopards (Panthera pardus orientalis) explores its enclosure next to its mother on July 8, 2011 at the zoo in Mulhouse, northeastern France. Every year there are about 250 to 350 births at the Mulhouse zoo. Some young animals, once weaned, can be introduced in protected zones of their original region. If not, they go to other zoos to make up other families. Genetic mixing is necessary for the animals' health and the survival of the species. AFP PHOTO / SEBASTIEN BOZON (Photo credit should read SEBASTIEN BOZON/AFP/Getty Images)