For more than six decades, Egypt has been ruled by a military dictatorship led by Hosni Mubarak, a military man that U.S. administrations long propped up with billions of dollars of military and economic aid.

Today, more than 16 months after Mubarak was ousted from power in an unprecedented popular uprising, some say Egyptians are living under an even more authoritarian military dictatorship.

Both presidential candidates, the Muslim Brotherhood's Mohammed Morsi, 60, and the old guard's Ahmed Shafiq, 70, claim to have won this past weekend's elections.

The U.S. has threatened to review billions of dollars of military and civilian aid to Egypt following the military's seeming "power grab" that included dissolving parliament, stripping the prospective president of legislative power and the title commander-in-chief. All of this follows Israel's mobilization of several tanks close to its border with Egypt after an attack from Egypt left one Arab-Israeli worker dead.

Did the military hijack the Egyptian revolution? Is this just the beginning? Is the United States serious about pressuring Egypt's military rulers to transition to an elected civilian government?


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