Does work ever make you want to smack your head against the wall?

That's nothing.

People have been flagellating themselves for ages, as a ritual of religious celebration and mourning. Even young children are often cut in some countries during the rituals, to re-enact historical and biblical events. But hey, a little blood never hurt anybody, right?

We've compiled a slideshow of particularly interesting (and sometimes, hard to look at) flagellation ceremonies for your viewing pleasure.

Be warned though: you're about to see a whole lot of self-impaling, beatings and blood. Enjoy.

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  • Self-Flagellation

    Jawad Zeiniddine, a one-year-old Lebanese Shiite Muslim boy wearing a headband with the name of Prophet Mohammed's grandson Imam Hussein, joins adults in a self-flagellation ritual during which they cut their scalps with blades to mark the religious mourning event of Ashura in the southern Lebanese town of Nabatiyeh on January 7, 2009. Ashura commemorates the seventh century killing of Prophet Mohammed's grandson Imam Hussein in Karbala, a holy shrine city in modern-time Iraq. (Joseph Barrak, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Iraqi Sufi Kurds take part in a ritual ceremony to commemorate the birth of Prophet Mohammed in the Kurdish town of Akra, 500 kms north of Baghdad, on February 5, 2012. Muslims around the world celebrate the birth of the prophet, known in Arabic as the 'Mawlid al-Nabawi' holiday, on the third month of the Islamic lunar calendar. (Safin Hamed, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    An Iraqi Shiite woman weeps as she flagellates herself while heading towards the holy city of Karbala, south of Baghdad, 17 March 2006. A suicide bomber killed himself and the driver of a microbus when he blew himself up in a predominantly Shiite east Baghdad neighborhood, police said. Four people standing near the otherwise empty bus were wounded by the blast, which appeared to be another sectarian attack. Friday saw a series of attacks all over Baghdad and its surroundings, mainly on Shiite pilgrims making their way on foot south to the Shiite holy city of Karbala. Tens of thousands of Shiites throughout the country are making their way on foot to Karbala for Sunday's annual commemoration of the end of the 40-days mourning period for Prophet Mohammed's grandson, Imam Hussein, martyred in 680 AD. (Ahmad Al-Rubaye, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    An Indian Muslim Sufi devotee uses a sharp objects as he self flagellates during a procession to the revered Muslim Shrine of Ajmer Sharif during the Urs Festival in Ajmer, Rajasthan, Monday, May 21, 2012. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India annually travel to the shrine of Sufi Muslim saint Hazrat Khwaja Muinuddin Chishti, for the annual Urs festival observed to mark his death anniversary. (Kevin Frayer, AP)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A penitent flagellates himself with a glass covered cork 07 April 2007, in the small Calabrian city of Nocera Terinese, southern Italy. Thousands of christians across the world celebrate Holy Week in a different aray of s pilgrimages and ceremonies. (Mario Laporta, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Pakistani Shiite Muslims perform ritual self-flagellation during the Ashura procession in Quetta, 20 January 2008. Pakistan was on high alert as Shiites observed the Muslim festival of Ashura, a day after security officials said they had foiled plots aimed at causing massive loss of life. (Banaras Khan, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A Shiite Muslim holds up a baby boy during a reenactment of the death of Imam Hussein outside the shrine of Imam Abbas on the eve of Ashura, the climax of the ten-day mourning period of the death of Imam Hussein, in the holy city Karbala, about 110 kms south of the Iraqi capital Baghdad on January 6, 2009. More than 50,000 foreigners from around the Middle East have converged on the Shiite city but the numbers are expected to swell ahead of the January 7 climax of the 10-day event which mourns the killing of Imam Hussein by armies of the Sunni caliph Yazid in the year 680. Last year two million devout Shiites attended the annual Ashura ceremonies in Karbala, which are characterised by processions of wailing men beating their chests and engaged in devotional self-flagellation. (Mohammed Sawaf, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Indian Shiite Muslims perform ritual self-flagellation during a religious procession on the tenth day of the holy month of Moharram in New Delhi on January 8, 2009. Ashura is a period of mourning in remembrance of the seventh-century martyrdom of Prophet Mohammad's grandson Imam Hussein, who was killed in the battle of Karbala in modern-day Iraq, in 680 AD (Manan Vatsyayana, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A Lebanese Shiite Muslim boy hits his head with a sword during self-flagellation rituals on the final day of Ashura in the southern Lebanese town of Nabatiyeh on December 27, 2009. Shiites in Iraq, Iran and Lebanon wrapped up the annual 10-day Ashura rituals which commemorate the killing of Imam Hussein, a grandson of the Prophet Mohammed, by armies of the Sunni caliph Yazid in 680. (Mahmoud Zayat, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    An Indian Shiite Muslim is covered with his own blood after self-flagellation during a religious procession in Mumbai on December 6, 2011. Devout Shiite Muslims the world over observe rituals - beating of their chests and self-flagellation during Ashura commemorations - marking the seventh century killing of Imam Hussein, the grandson of Prophet Mohammad, in the Battle of Karbala in central Iraq. (Indranil Mukherjee, AFP / Getty Imagess)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Indian Shiite Muslims take part in a self-flagellation ritual during a religious procession of the Ashura mourning period in New Delhi on December 17, 2010. The religious festival of Ashura, which includes a ten-day mourning period starting on the first day of Muharram on the Islamic calendar, commemorates the seventh-century slaying of Prophet Mohammed's grandson Imam Hussein in Karbala. (Prakash Singh, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A Kashmiri Shiite Muslim perform a ritual of self-flagellation with a cluster of knives during a Ashura procession in Srinagar on December 17, 2010. The religious festival of Ashura, which includes a ten-day mourning period starting on the first day of the holy Islamic month of Muharram on the Islamic calendar, commemorates the seventh-century slaying of Prophet Mohammed's grandson Imam Hussein in Karbala. Shias show their grief and sorrow by inflicting wounds on their own bodies with sharp metal tied to chain with which they scourge themselves, in order to depict the sufferings of the martyrs. (Tauseef Mustafa, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    An Indian Muslim Sufi devotee uses a sharp objects as he self flagellates during a procession to the revered Muslim Shrine of Ajmer Sharif during the Urs Festival in Ajmer, Rajasthan, Monday, May 21, 2012. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India annually travel to the shrine of Sufi Muslim saint Hazrat Khwaja Muinuddin Chishti, for the annual Urs festival observed to mark his death anniversary. (Kevin Frayer, AP)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A Shiite Muslim pilgrim slaps his back with metal chains as he performs a self-flagellation ritual on January 24, 2011 in the central Iraqi shrine city of Karbala, 120 kms south of the capital Baghdad, ahead of the upcoming Arbaeen religious festival which marks the 40th day after Ashura. Ashura commemorates the killing of the Prophet Mohammed's grandson the Imam Hussein in the seventh century (680AD) by armies of the caliph Yazid in the battle of Karbala. (Mohammed Sawaf, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Iraqi Shiite boys use knives in a self-flagellation ritual in Baghdad on December 5, 2011 during Ashura commemorations marking the 7th century killing of Imam Hussein, the grandson of Prophet Mohammed, in the Battle of Karbala in central Iraq. (Ahmad Al-Rubaye, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Indian Shiite Muslims perform a ritual of self-flagellation in a religious procession in the old quarters of New Delhi on December 6, 2011 during Ashura commemorations marking the seventh century killing of Imam Hussein, the grandson of Prophet Mohammed, in the Battle of Karbala in central Iraq. (Sajjad Hussain, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    NEW DELHI, INDIA - DECEMBER 06: Blood drips down from the face of a Shi'ite Muslim boy after practicing a self-flagellation ritual during a religious procession of the Ashura mourning period on December 6, 2011 in New Delhi, India. Hundreds of Muslims in New Delhi and thousands around India took part in a procession to mark the 10th day of the Islamic month of Muharram when they remember the killing of Imam Hussain, the grandson of Prophet Mohammed, who was martyred some at the Battle of Karbala, Iraq in 61AH. Shia men and women dressed in black crying and beating their chests participated in the capital's processions to mark this important date in the Islamic calendar. On Muharram Muslims also undetake voluntary fasting, give to charity and pray in remembrance of Hussain. (Daniel Berehulak, Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A penitent prays at a chapel after performing self flagellation during an annual ritual on Good Friday, April 9, 2004 in Cutud, San Fernando, Philippines. Since the 1950's, a dozen or so penitents participate in an annual re-enactment of Christ's crucifixion, a practice that the Catholic Church frowns upon. (David Greedy, Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    NEW DELHI, INDIA - DECEMBER 06: Shi'ite Muslim men and boys beat their chests as they practice self-flagellation during the religious ritual of Ashura on December 6, 2011 in New Delhi, India. Hundreds of Muslims in New Delhi and thousands around India took part in a procession to mark the 10th day of the Islamic month of Muharram when they remember the killing of Imam Hussain, the grandson of Prophet Mohammed, who was martyred some at the Battle of Karbala, Iraq in 61AH. Shia men and women dressed in black crying and beating their chests participated in the capital's processions to mark this important date in the Islamic calendar. On Muharram Muslims also undetake voluntary fasting, give to charity and pray in remembrance of Hussain. (Daniel Berehulak, Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Indian Muslim Sufi devotees use sharp objects as they self flagellate during a procession to the revered Muslim Shrine of Ajmer Sharif during the Urs Festival in Ajmer, Rajasthan, Monday, May 21, 2012. Thousands of Sufi devotees from different parts of India annually travel to the shrine of Sufi Muslim saint Hazrat Khwaja Muinuddin Chishti, for the annual Urs festival observed to mark his death anniversary. (Kevin Frayer, AP)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A Pakistani Shiite Muslim mourner performs religious rituals during an Ashura procession in Karachi on December 6, 2011, on the tenth day of the holy month of Moharram, to mark the martyrdom of seventh century saint Imam Hussain. Shiite Muslims stage religious processions on Ashura to commemorate the death of the Prophet Mohammed's grandson Hussain at Karbala in modern-day Iraq in 680 AD. Reciting elegies and hymns, participants carry black banners and march behind replicas of Imam Hussain's tomb in Iraq, whipping their backs in a display of devotion. (Asif Hassan, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Kashmiri Shiite Muslims perform a ritual of self-flagellation with knives during a religious procession in downtown Srinagar on December 6,2011 held on the 10th day of Ashura, which commemorates the slaying of the Prophet Mohammed's grandson in southern Iraq in the seventh century. During the Shiite Muslim holy month of Muharram, large processions are formed and the devotees parade the streets holding banners and carrying models of the mausoleum of Hazrat Imam Hussain and his people, who fell at Karbala. Shias show their grief and sorrow by inflicting wounds on their own bodies with sharp metal tied to chains to depict the sufferings of the martyrs. (Tauseef Mustafa, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Kashmiri Shiite Muslims perform a ritual of self-flagellation with knives during a religious procession in downtown Srinagar on December 6,2011 held on the 10th day of Ashura, which commemorates the slaying of the Prophet Mohammed's grandson in southern Iraq in the seventh century. During the Shiite Muslim holy month of Muharram, large processions are formed and the devotees parade the streets holding banners and carrying models of the mausoleum of Hazrat Imam Hussain and his people, who fell at Karbala. Shias show their grief and sorrow by inflicting wounds on their own bodies with sharp metal tied to chains to depict the sufferings of the martyrs. (Tauseef Mustafa, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Kashmiri Shiite Muslims perform a ritual of self-flagellation with knives during a religious procession in downtown Srinagar on December 6,2011 held on the 10th day of Ashura, which commemorates the slaying of the Prophet Mohammed's grandson in southern Iraq in the seventh century. During the Shiite Muslim holy month of Muharram, large processions are formed and the devotees parade the streets holding banners and carrying models of the mausoleum of Hazrat Imam Hussain and his people, who fell at Karbala. Shias show their grief and sorrow by inflicting wounds on their own bodies with sharp metal tied to chains to depict the sufferings of the martyrs. (Tauseef Mustafa, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Bahraini Shiite Muslim men hit their heads with swords during Ashura mourning rituals in Manama on December 6, 2011 to commemorate the death of Imam Hussein, a grandson of the Prophet Mohammed, who was killed by armies of the caliph Yazid near Karbala in 680 AD. (AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    A Balinese in a trance stabs himself with "keris" traditional daggers as he and while fellow Balineses attend the Melasti ceremony prayer at Petitenget beach in Kuta on the island of Bali on March 20, 2012. Melasti is a purification festival which is held three days before Nyepi, a day in silent, as during the Nyepi day Hindus on the island of Bali are not allowed to work, travel or take part in any indulgence. (Sonny Tumbelaka, AFP / Getty Images)

  • Self-Flagellation

    Devotees in self-flagellation arrive at the site of the reenactment of the crucifixion to complete their penetence during Good Friday in the village of Cutud, San Fernando City, north of Manila on April 6, 2012. Roman Catholic fanatics in the Philippines had themselves nailed to the cross April 6, in a bloody display of religious frenzy as the Christian world marked the day Jesus was crucified. (Ted Aljibe, AFP / Getty Images)