James Cameron's "Avatar" sequels have become a white whale for movie fans: The type of project so desired and yet so seemingly out of reach. The first sequel was initially set to hit theaters in 2014, but that was recently pushed back to 2016 -- at the earliest. Now, though, it appears that all of this wanting may be worth the wait. According to "Avatar" star Sigourney Weaver, Cameron is planning to shoot "Avatar 2," "Avatar 3" and "Avatar 4" in the near future. The three films will be completed consecutively.

Speaking with Showbiz 411's Roger Friedman at the premiere of the new USA series "Political Animals," Weaver revealed that she'll be heading back to Pandora soon -- perhaps before the end of the year. (Unfortunately, Friedman doesn't offer any concrete quotes from Weaver, beyond the actress saying that she will just "show up" for Cameron.)

Of course, none of this is too surprising. Cameron himself said that he was only in "the 'Avatar' business" during an interview earlier this year.

"I'm making 'Avatar 2,' 'Avatar 3,' maybe 'Avatar 4,'" Cameron revealed to the New York Times during an interview about the Chinese film industry. "I'm not going to produce other people's movies for them. I’m not interested in taking scripts."

The inclusion of Weaver in any "Avatar" sequel might seem confusing -- spoiler alert for the three people who didn't see the $2.7 billion-grossing blockbuster: Weaver's character dies -- but Cameron isn't concerned about getting her involved in future Pandora adventures.

"Have you ever heard of nonlinear storytelling? A lot happens on that planet before she shows up, and before Jake shows up to join her," he told Vulture. "She's there for fifteen years ahead of time. I don't know, but I wouldn’t jump to conclusions. [...] When you have a science-fiction series, a science-fiction franchise, you're never dead, unless your DNA is expunged from the universe. And then there's always time travel!"

For more on Weaver's future, head over to Showbiz 411. Look for "Avatar 2" to arrive in theaters eventually.

[via Showbiz 411]

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  • This February 2012 file photo provided by National Geographic, shows explorer and filmmaker James Cameron emerging from the hatch of DEEPSEA CHALLENGER during testing of the submersible in Jervis Bay, south of Sydney, Australia. Cameron on Sunday, March 25, 2012 began his journey to someplace only two men have gone before �-- to the Earth's deepest point. The director of "Titanic," ''Avatar" and other films is using the specially designed submarine to descend nearly seven miles (11 kilometers) to the bottom of the Mariana Trench, an area 200 miles (320 kilometers) southwest of the Pacific island of Guam. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen, File)

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron gets a handshake from ocean explorer and U.S. Navy Capt. Don Walsh, right, just before the hatch on the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible is closed and the voyage to the deepest part of the ocean begins, Sunday, March 25, 2012. Walsh took the same journey to the bottom of the Mariana Trench 52 years ago in the bathyscaphe Trieste with Swiss oceanographer Jacques Piccard. Cameron is the first person to complete the dive solo. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • In this photo provided by National Geographic, the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible carrying filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron is hoisted into the Pacific Ocean on its way to the "Challenger Deep," the deepest part of the Mariana Trench, Sunday, March 25, 2012. The dive was part of DEEPSEA CHALLENGE, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/National Geographic, Mark Thiessen) MANDATORY CREDIT

  • This February 2012 handout photo provided by National Geographic shows the DEEPSEA CHALLENGER submersible begining its first test dive off the coast of Papua New Guinea. Earth's lost frontier, the deepest part of the oceans where the pressure is like three SUVs sitting on your little tow, is about to be explored first-hand. It's been more than half a century since man dared to plunge that deep. Earth's lost frontier is about to be explored firsthand after more than half a century. It's a mission to the deepest part of the ocean, so deep that the pressure is the equivalent of three SUVs sitting on your toe. And it's being launched by the rich and famous. In the next several days, James Cameron, the director of �"Titanic,�" �"Avatar�" and �"The Abyss,�" plans to dive nearly 7 miles deep in a one-man sub he helped design. The location is the Mariana Trench in the South Pacific. �"It's the last frontier for science and exploration on this planet,�" Cameron said. (AP Photo/Mark Thiessen, National Geographic)

  • In an image provided by National Geographic filmmaker James Cameron gives two thumbs-up as he emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible Monday March 26, 2012 after his successful solo dive in the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)

  • Filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron emerges from the Deepsea Challenger submersible after his successful solo dive to the Mariana Trench, the deepest part of the ocean, Monday March 26, 2011. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic) ONE TIME USE

  • In a photo provided by National Geographic filmmaker and National Geographic Explorer-in-Residence James Cameron holds the National Geographic Society flag after he successfully completed the first ever solo dive to the Mariana Trench Monday March 26, 2012. The dive was part of Deepsea Challenge, a joint scientific expedition by Cameron, the National Geographic Society and Rolex to conduct deep-ocean research. (AP Photo/Mark Theissen, National Geographic)

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