On Saturday, millions of Libyans headed to the polls in the country's first election since the fall of longtime dictator Muammar Gaddafi. Libya votes to elect a 200-seat parliament, which will form a new government.

The Associated Press reports:

Lines formed outside polling centers more than an hour before they opened in the capital Tripoli, with policemen and soldiers standing guard and searching voters and election workers before they entered.

"I have a strange but beautiful feeling today," dentist Adam Thabet said as he waited his turn to cast a ballot. "We are free at last after years of fear. We knew this day would come, but we were afraid it would take a lot longer."

Learn all you need to know about Libya's historic vote in the slideshow below.

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  • Eligible voters: 3.3 million.<br><br> <em>A Libyan woman holds a banner in support of the Muslim Brotherhood party in Martyr's Square in Tripoli, Libya, Thursday 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)</em>

  • Registered voters: Almost 2.9 million.<br><br> <em>In this Wednesday, July 4 , 2012 photo, Libyans attend an Al Wattan Party rally at the seaport of Tripoli, Libya. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)</em>

  • Not eligible to vote: Officials from Gadhafi's regime.<br><br> <em>In this Oct. 10, 2010 file photo, Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi, center, with Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak, right, and his Yemeni counterpart Ali Abdullah Saleh, center left, pose for a group photo with Arab and African leaders during the second Afro-Arab summit in Sirte, Libya. (AP Photo/Amr Nabil)</em>

  • Polls open on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. local time (2 a.m. to 2 p.m. EDT; 0600 to 1800 GMT).<br><br> <em>A Libyan election official works at a polling station in Tripoli, Libya, Friday, July 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)</em>

  • Results expected within a week of voting.<br><br> <em>A Libyan election official works at a polling station in Tripoli, Libya, Friday, July 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)</em>

  • Allocation of seats: 100 for Tripoli and the west, 60 for Benghazi and the east, 40 for southwest.<br><br> <em>Libyan election officials work at a polling station in Tripoli, Libya, Friday, July 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)</em>

  • Candidates seeking election: About 3,700, including 585 women. <em>Libyan men pray during the reflection day at the main mosque in Tripoli, Libya, Friday, July 6, 2012. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)</em>

  • Main contenders: Muslim Brotherhood (Islamists), Al-Watan (Salafis and other Islamists), Alliance of National Forces (secular), National Front (veteran opposition to Gadhafi), National Centrist (former Finance Minister Ali Tarhouni).<br><br> <em>A Libyan Muslim Brotherhood supporter runs holding a flag of the party in Martyr's Square in Tripoli, Libya, Thursday, July 5, 2012. (AP Photo/Manu Brabo)</em>

  • Next steps: New Assembly appoints Cabinet within 30 days. A second election for a 60-member body to write a new constitution. Referendum on constitution. Election for new parliament in 2013.<br><br> <em>The new transitional cabinet ministers stand during a press conference in Tripoli, Libya, Thursday, Nov. 24, 2011. (AP Photo/Abdel Magid al-Fergany)</em>