2012-01-18-GreatistLogoFullGray.jpg
By Lisa LaValle Overmyer

The temperatures are rising, which can drive some people to the comfort of an air-conditioned gym. Hesitant to exercise outdoors? Don't sweat it -- there are a number of ways to beat the heat and get a great workout without hiding in the gym (or at home!) all summer long.

It's Getting Hot In Here -- The Need-To-Know
Short of removing all of one's clothing, Nelly might have been on to something. Exercising in high heat and humidity intensifies how hard the body needs to work to maintain normal function. During workouts, core temperature naturally rises, but this can happen far more quickly on a hot day. The body's response is to turn on the sweat glands and circulate more blood to the skin in order to cool it down (clothing optional). As the workout continues, the heart pumps faster to send blood to muscles and to the skin.

Summer means sweat, and all that perspiration means one thing: potential dehydration. The hotter the temperature, the more risk for dehydration, especially during an intense workout. Dehydration can actually affect the brain, impairing short-term memory and the ability to estimate fatigue, meaning the brain can think the body isn't working as hard as it actually is -- a dangerous state to be in when temperatures are high.

High core temperature, increased heart rate and dehydration create a perfect storm that could turn into one of three heat-related illnesses: heat cramps, heat exhaustion or -- the most serious -- heatstroke. Warning signs include muscle cramps, nausea and dizziness, but by taking the proper precautions, a summer workout can be a breeze.

Be Cool -- Your Action Plan
There are plenty of ways to avoid the scary stuff. Here are six things any one can do to (literally) beat the heat:

Loading Slideshow...
  • 1. Hydrate

    The number one, Grade-A, most important thing to do is hydrate. Then hydrate again. And then hydrate some more! Loading the body with hydrating fluids before exercise can help summer athletes work out longer before the risk of dehydration sets in. But what to drink and when? One study specifically recommends drinking plenty of fluid two hours before exercise, five to 10 ounces of fluid every 15 minutes during exercise, and fluids with increased sodium content after exercise. Exercising in the heat can also sweat out sodium and electrolytes, which are both useful for athletic performance. Just be careful not to <a href="http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com/overhydration" target="_hplink">overhydrate</a>, which can be just as dangerous as dehydration. <strong>More from Greatist:</strong> <a href="http://greatist.com/fitness/muscle-loss-strength-atrophy/" target="_hplink">How to Stay Strong and Prevent Muscle Loss</a> <a href="http://greatist.com/fitness/olympic-beach-volleyball/" target="_hplink">Olympic Cheat Sheet: Beach Volleyball</a> <a href="http://greatist.com/health/crusaders-for-health-food-industry/" target="_hplink">Top 15 Crusaders for Health in the Food Industry</a> <em>Flickr photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/sskennel/4818299373/" target="_hplink">sskennel</a></em>

  • 2. Drink Something Cold

    On a hot day it's better to drink something cold before exercising as a way to preemptively cool the body down. In one study, male cyclists drank either a cold or a warm beverage 30 minutes before a workout. Those that drank the cold beverage were able to pedal longer, had lower skin temperatures, and had lower heart rates than those that drank a warm beverage. Bonus points: Having a cold drink before a workout is much more practical (and money smart) than other precooling strategies, like taking ice baths. <em>Flickr photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/pinksherbet/5685106294/" target="_hplink">Pink Sherbet Photography</a></em>

  • 3. Electrolytes

    It's also important to replenish <a href="http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/ency/article/002350.htm" target="_hplink">electrolytes</a>, lost through sweat, during warm weather workouts. Electrolytes, such as sodium and potassium, help the body retain and absorb water. Most sports drinks provide a good amount of electrolytes, and electrolyte powders are also available to amp up regular water. Use caution though -- <a href="http://www.yaleruddcenter.org/resources/upload/docs/what/policy/SSBtaxes/SSB_SportsDrinks_Spring2012 .pdf" target="_hplink">many sports drinks contain extra sugar and other additives</a>, which add up to unnecessary calories. Good thing sports drinks aren't the only way to get those much-needed electrolytes! One study compared the effects of rehydrating with water, mineral water, Gatorade, and a mixture of apple juice and water. The only beverage that showed any difference in restoring electrolytes after exercise in the heat was the apple juice-water drink -- those that drank it retained more potassium than the others. (Potential apple juice bonus: Potassium also helps prevent muscle cramps.) The study used a small sample, so make sure to try out whatever fluids give the best personal results.

  • 4. Carbo-Loading

    Electrolytes aren't the only things to stock up on: The body also needs more carbohydrates during intense workouts in the heat. Carbo-loading is a good idea for an endurance event. Try making carbs about <a href="http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/carbohydrate-loading/MY00223" target="_hplink">50 to 55 percent of your total calories</a> about a week before, then ramping up to about 70 percent in the days just before the event. Smaller athletes should aim for 4.5 grams of carbs per pound of bodyweight (3.5 for larger athletes such as, say, weightlifters). One study recommends chugging sports drinks when a workout will last longer than an hour because the carbs will <a href="http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/health-tip/HT00212/" target="_hplink">provide more energy</a> to power through in the stretch. <em>Flickr photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/maggiejane/3550517752/" target="_hplink">Maggie Hoffman</a></em>

  • 5. Climate

    Acclimatization to the heat is also important when preparing for summer workouts. Gradually increase the intensity and duration of outdoor workouts in the heat so the body can better adjust and adapt to the conditions. Proper acclimatization can result in better sweat response, lowered heart rate, and lowered body temperature. The process can take up to 10 to 14 days, but it's important to ease into the new regime during the first few days for best results. <em>Flickr photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/lululemonathletica/4625740774/" target="_hplink">lululemon athletica</a></em>

  • 6. Morning People

    Another pro tip is to exercise in the morning. It may seem obvious, since outdoor temperatures are lower early in the day, but our body temperatures are also lower in the a.m. than in the afternoon. When the alarm goes off, try to throw on some <a href="http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/exercise/HQ00316/NSECTIONGROUP=2" target="_hplink">light-colored clothing</a>. It reflects light, which will help keep the body cooler than dark colors, which absorb light. <strong>More from Greatist:</strong> <a href="http://greatist.com/fitness/muscle-loss-strength-atrophy/" target="_hplink">How to Stay Strong and Prevent Muscle Loss</a> <a href="http://greatist.com/fitness/olympic-beach-volleyball/" target="_hplink">Olympic Cheat Sheet: Beach Volleyball</a> <a href="http://greatist.com/health/crusaders-for-health-food-industry/" target="_hplink">Top 15 Crusaders for Health in the Food Industry</a> <em>Flickr photo by <a href="http://www.flickr.com/photos/rowens27/3163470179/" target="_hplink">rowens27</a></em>

Follow these tips, and it should be a piece of cake to rock a summertime workout. Need a bigger incentive to step away from the gym? There's a special bonus to successfully training in the heat: things could be easier when temperatures drop. A study showed that the effects of proper heat acclimatization -- improved sweat response, lowered heart rate and lowered body temperature -- stay with an athlete even when training in cooler temperatures. Now those are details worth sweating over!

This article has been read and approved by Greatist Experts Matthew McGorry and Noam Tamir.

Fore more on fitness and exercise, click here.