The hero Gotham deserves, deserves a bigger cape.

That's what four University of Leicester students discovered when they measured the caped crusader's flying abilities and found that while Batman could fly - or rather, glide through the air - the impact from his landing would likely wreck his body unless he fought crime with a bigger cape.

Reuters reported that the students, in a paper titled, "The Trajectory of a Falling Batman," calculated that if Batman jumped from a building 492 ft. tall, then, with the wingspan of his cape at 15 ft., he could glide about 1,148 ft., growing up to a speed of about 68 miles per hour, before smashing to his projected doom at an estimated 50 miles per hour.

"If Batman wanted to survive the flight, he would definitely need a bigger cape," David Marshall told Reuters. Marshall is one of the students gaining a four-year Master of Physics degree to conduct this study.

Marshall also told the BBC that Batman can get about twice as far as he falls. However, when Batman did fall, "he would likely end up getting a bit splattered," he said.

He and the three other students are set to graduate this Thursday, and all four Batman fans have plans to pursue doctoral degrees.

Hypervocal.com features the students' entire study - fancy geek graphs and charts included - on their site.

Christopher Nolan's "The Dark Knight Rises" will open in theaters on July 20, and it has reportedly been estimated to accrue $150 million in ticket sales during its first weekend, according to the Los Angeles Times. For those who can't wait to feel all the high-flying action, check out Empire's online release of the movie's entire soundtrack.

Earlier on HuffPost College:

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  • Puppeteering

    With the aid of late puppeteer Frank W. Ballard, the University of Connecticut has become a proud leader in the art of puppeteering, offering a B.F.A., M.A. and M.F.A. The <a href="http://www.drama.uconn.edu/Puppetry/Puppet_home.htm" target="_hplink">school reports</a> that since the program's beginning in 1964, there have been nearly 500 student puppet productions. In an <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2010/06/14/arts/14ballard.html" target="_hplink"><em>New York Times</em></a> article published after Ballard's death, the program was lauded as "a Mecca for puppeteers in training."

  • Packaging

    Schools such as <a href="http://www.reg.msu.edu/academicprograms/ProgramDetail.asp?Program=0405" target="_hplink">Michigan State University</a> provides this program in order to maximize a student's career in the manufactured products industries. Required classes include a range of serious science and math classes, along with courses titled "Packaging with Glass and Metal" and "Packaging with Paper and Paperboard."

  • Viticulture & Enology: Grape Growing and Winemaking

    UC Davis and Cornell University take advantage of their ripe location in providing this major. As <a href="http://grapesandwine.cals.cornell.edu/cals/grapesandwine/undergraduate/index.cfm" target="_hplink">Cornell's website </a>explains, "Due to rapid growth in the region's wine industry, there simply aren't enough people qualified to manage vineyards and run wineries," while <a href="http://wineserver.ucdavis.edu/" target="_hplink">UC Davis</a> states that the University of California has had this sort of program for over 100 years.

  • Comic Art

    Acknowledging the significance of comic books in modern society, <a href="http://mcad.edu/academic-programs/comic-art" target="_hplink">Minneapolis College of Art and Design </a>offers a B.F.A in Comic Art. Students in the program study "line, color, and composition, as well as character development, storyboarding, and plot." Future careers include: Cartoonist, Comic Editor, Comic Illustrator, Comic Writer, Penciler, Colorist, Letterer, Inker

  • Bowling Industry Management and Technology

    At Vincennes University in Indiana, the laboratory is substituted for a bowling center. According to the school's <a href="http://www.vinu.edu/content/bowling-industry-management-and-technology" target="_hplink">website</a>, the major is intended to prepare students for "management of a bowling center, sales and marketing, pro shop operations, and pinsetter mechanics."

  • Bagpipes

    <a href="http://www.cmu.edu/about/history/index.shtml" target="_hplink">Andrew Carnegie</a> did not neglect to honor his Scottish roots when he established Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, PA in 1900. Since the early 1990s, the school has offered a degree in bagpipes. In an interview with the <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/1990/07/15/style/campus-life-carnegie-mellon-a-different-beat-when-bagpiping-becomes-a-major.html" target="_hplink"><em>New York Times</em></a> in 1990, Marilyn Taft Thomas, head of Carnegie Mellon's music department stated, "The entire tradition of campus has been to have celebratory bagpiping. It just makes sense for us to acknowledge bagpipes as a legitimate musical instrument."

  • Bakery Science and Management

    In this major, available at <a href="http://www.ag.ksu.edu/p.aspx?tabid=876" target="_hplink">Kansas State University</a>, students not only take classes in baking and cereal science, milling, flour and dough testing, but also in math, science, and microbiology. The program falls under the larger College of Agriculture, and is listed among other unique majors offered within the College, such as <a href="http://www.ag.ksu.edu/p.aspx?tabid=995" target="_hplink">Wildlife and Outdoor Enterprise Management</a> or <a href="http://www.ag.ksu.edu/p.aspx?tabid=882" target="_hplink">Park Management and Conservation</a>.

  • Video Game Design

    Video game fanatics can live out their dream at certain colleges by majoring in video game design. The major can be found at a plethora of different universities, with schools as prestigious as such<a href="http://cinema.usc.edu/degrees/minor/videogame.cfm" target="_hplink"> University of Southern California </a>providing a minor in Video Game Design & Management.