Anti-tax zealot Grover Norquist provided a fresh rebuttal to an old critic Monday, accusing Sen. Tom Coburn (R-Okla.) of standing "alone" in his claim that solving the fiscal crisis will require more open-mindedness when it comes to a balanced approach.

In a New York Times op-ed published Sunday, Coburn accused Norquist of becoming "increasingly isolated politically" by pushing a no-new-taxes pledge on Congressional Republicans that forbids tax hikes unless accompanied by dollar-for-dollar deductions.

Coburn also wrote that Norquist only gives Democratic legislators the political fodder they need to paint the GOP as receiving its "marching orders" from a stubborn ideologue.

"The majority of Democrats and Republicans understand the severity of our economic challenges," Coburn concluded. "They know they have to put everything on the table and make hard choices. Legislators who would rather foster political boogeyman only delay those critical reforms."

In an interview with The Hill on Monday, Norquist dismissed Coburn's argument, saying the pledge is not open to "interpretation." Norquist suggested that Corburn has "gone native or developed Stockholm Syndrome" from sitting alongside Sen. Dick Durbin (D-Ill.) during Gang of Six meetings, referring to the bipartisan discussions surrounding the debt ceiling crisis last summer.

"When Coburn stands up and says, 'I want to raise taxes,' he stands alone," Norquist said.

Sunday's op-ed marks the latest in a series of Coburn-backed challenges to the ubiquitous pledge, which has been signed by 238 representatives and 41 senators -- all but three of them Republicans -- in the 112th Congress.

Earlier this year, Coburn took on Norquist's vague definition of a tax by supporting the elimination of a multi-billion-dollar ethanol subsidy, which Norquist deemed a tax increase.

"Grover's old news. It doesn't matter what he says," Coburn told MSNBC the same day he cast the procedural vote, which Norquist warned would be a pledge violation.

Lawmakers on both sides of the aisle have criticized the Taxpayer Protection Pledge for restricting them from closing loopholes.

In one of the pledge's more high-profile defections, Rep. Scott Rigell (R-Va.) yanked his signature and released a two-page letter to constituents explaining why he could not support the anti-tax oath. He wrote that he objects to the pledge's prohibition against getting rid of corporate loopholes or government subsidies unless the change in the tax code is revenue neutral.

"Though I suppose well intended, it directly inhibited the very goal we seek to advance, which is tax reform," Rigell told The Huffington Post earlier this month.

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  • John Shadegg Wields A Baby

    In this past weekend's health care debate, Arizona Republican John Shadegg bravely opened a new frontier by <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2009/11/10/jon-stewart-mocks-use-of_n_351911.html">using a live baby as a visual aid</a> to complain about health care reform. The infant, Maddie, was introduced as Shadegg's grand-daughter, which Shadegg quickly corrected, saying, "I wish this <i>was</i> my granddaughter." I wish most Congresspersons demonstrated Maddie's level of cognitive development, but no!

  • Alan Grayson Warns We Will All Die Slowly

    Florida Democrat Alan Grayson made headlines when he took to the well of the House of Representatives<a href="http://airamerica.com/politics/10-27-2009/grayson/"> to warn that the GOP health care plan</a> was for all of the nation's uninsured to DIE QUICKLY! But not so quick that you miss all of the manufactured suspense as Grayson flipped through his poster boards.

  • Tom Latham Regifts The Chinese

    Iowa Republican Tom Latham hates him some cap and trade. So much that he <a href="http://www.realclearpolitics.com/politics_nation/2009/06/latham_brings_props_to_house_f.html">decided to box up a hard hat</a> with the words "American Jobs" written on it and send it to China, as a gift. How thoughtful! And all we've gotten in return is a mess of poisonous toys.

  • Peter Roskam's Into Bondage

    Illinois Republican Peter Roskam took a look at the health care bill and saw handcuffs. And "not figurative handcuffs," <a href="http://hotair.com/archives/2009/11/09/video-if-obamacare-is-so-good/">Roskam said</a>, "actual criminal penalties." So, you <i>do</i> mean figurative handcuffs? Anyway, it's a good thing David Vitter sits in the U.S. Senate, because he would have probably been a little inappropriately interested in this presentation.

  • Michele Bachmann Get's Lei'd

    Minnesota Republican Michele Bachmann made the acquaintance of some hula dancing Teabaggers from Hawaii, and they brought her a lei, which Bachmann herself could obtain at the airport in Hawaii, were it not for the fact that she believes planes cannot fly over water without the use of witchcraft. Anyway, <a href="http://minnesotaindependent.com/49288/bachmann-lei-health-care-steve-israel-holocaust">she told Congress</a>, "I’m reminded that the one who created this lei also created our freedom. Are we so insensible to the high cost our forebearers paid to purchase our freedom?" So, the Hawaiian Bureau of Tourism created our freedom? I guess this is not supposed to make much sense.

  • Chuck Grassley, Dragon Slayer

    <a href="http://www.thedailyshow.com/watch/tue-august-4-2009/chuck-grassley-s-debt-and-deficit-dragon">CLASSIC CHUCK GRASSLEY</a> (R-Iowa) here, as the Iowan mixed all the metaphors he had at his disposal to inveigh against health care reform: Sir Lancelot! Dragons! Painful weapons! Golden egg-laying geese! The whole thing was like having a Pear Of Anguish inserted into your brain. Unless, of course, you were Maddie -- John Shadegg's not-granddaughter -- who probably likes the pretty pictures!

  • Chuck Grassley Saw A Bill Murray Movie

    More from Charles Grassley: "We should not legislate in a hasty manner and place ourselves in an infinite loop," says Grassley, apparently <a href="http://www.politico.com/blogs/anneschroeder/0608/Chuck_Grassley_is_a_Bill_Murray_fan.html">drawing the wrong lesson from Bill Murray's GROUNDHOG DAY</a>, in which said "infinite loop" allowed Bill Murray's character the chance to experience personal growth, so that he was no longer the sort of preening dick who'd waste the time of serious people with comparisons to movies he saw one night on Comedy Central.

  • Orrin Hatch Hates Robin Hood

    Utah Republican Orrin Hatch LOVES HIM some children's tales, too, it seems. Thankfully, he kept his stories straight, <a href="http://www.brendan-nyhan.com/blog/2009/04/orrin-hatch-quotes-from-disneys-robin-hood.html">citing Robin Hood</a> as a way of discussing Obama's infernal plan to redistribute wealth in America. It's not clear that Hatch quite understands who would be the Sheriff of Nottingham in this metaphor. But look, just be thankful Hatch didn't burst into an impromptu performance of Bryan Adams's "(Everything I Do) I Do It For You." Hatch, we remind you, fancies himself to be quite the singer.

  • Frank Lautenberg Is Sick Of These Star Wars

    New Jersey Democrat Frank Lautenberg <a href="http://rawstory.com/exclusives/byrne/lautenberg_judges_star_wars_519">compared then Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist's threat</a> to eliminate the Senate filibuster to Star Wars' Emperor Palpatine's efforts to destroy galactic freedom, murder the Jedi and crush "terrorism" with the Death Star. Flash forward to today, and suddenly the elimination of the Senate filibuster doesn't seem like such a bad idea, eh, Senate Democrats?

  • George Voinovich: Prop Master

    When it comes to Congressional visual aids, the master of the form is Ohio Republican George Voinovich, who was the Jean-Michel Basquiat of poster-board-based metaphorical imagery. Check out all that elaborate work! The lovingly rendered "Emperor's New Clothes," the detailed Wheel of Fortune, the G4 Channel courting Pac Man nonsense...<a href="http://www.politico.com/click/stories/0911/charting_the_course.html">we're going to miss the senator when he retires</a>. But you know who won't miss him? The poor interns who had to build this crap.