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John Hickenlooper Ducks Question On Colorado's Gun Laws (VIDEO)

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WASHINGTON -- Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) dodged a question Sunday about whether he should revisit the state's gun laws in the wake of Friday's mass shooting in Aurora.

"I’m sure that that is going to happen, but I look at this, this wasn’t a Colorado problem, this is a human problem, right?" Hickenlooper said on ABC's "This Week." "And how we can have such a warped individual, and no one around him be aware?"

"You know, I worry that if we got rid all of the guns," he continued, "and certainly we have so many guns in this country, we do have a lot more gun violence than many other countries -- but even if you didn't have access to guns, this guy was diabolical. Right? He would have found explosives, he would have found something else, some sort of poisonous gas, he would have done something to create this horror."

Aurora Mayor Steve Hogan, who appeared alongside Hickenlooper on the show, placed the blame on alleged shooter James Holmes as well, rather on the need for stricter gun laws.

"He just, by every standard, appeared normal," Hogan said. "Clearly there's something wrong here...there was something wrong with this individual."

The Colorado shooting has led to a renewed focus on gun control, after Holmes allegedly opened fire at a movie theater during a midnight showing of "The Dark Knight Rises," killing 12 people and injuring 58 others.

Shortly after the incident, New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg called on President Barack Obama and presumptive Republican nominee Mitt Romney to detail their plans to tighten gun laws.

"You know, soothing words are nice, but maybe it’s time that the two people who want to be President of the United States stand up and tell us what they are going to do about it, because this is obviously a problem across the country," Bloomberg said on Friday.

The shooting in Aurora is the country's deadliest since the attack at Fort Hood, Texas, on Nov. 5, 2009, when an Army psychiatrist was charged with murdering 13 soldiers and civilians and injuring more than two dozen others.

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