Talk about sibling rivalry.

Google recently acquired Wildfire Interactive Inc., an advertising startup that specializes in working with social networking sites. Wildfire also just so happens to be one of Facebook's leading marketing partners.

Cue the awkward turtle!

Courtesy of Kanemari.Tumblr.com

While this new match may make for some strained business interactions, it might make things even more uncomfortable when Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg and his siblings sit down to their next family dinner.

One of Zuck's younger sisters, Arielle, is a junior product manager for Wildfire and will now presumably be employed by Google, which last year placed itself in direct competition with Facebook when it launched social network Google+. Arielle Zuckerberg has been with the marketing software startup since her graduation from Claremont McKenna College in 2011, per her LinkedIn profile.

According to Business Insider, another of Mark Zuckerberg's sisters, Donna, is married to Wildfire product strategist Harry Schmidt. This means that two members of the Zuckerberg clan will be Google employees.

So far, the family seems to be making light of the situation. On Tuesday, the eldest Zuckerberg, Randi, tweeted warm wishes to her relatives: "Congrats Wildfire! There are officially now more Zuckerberg family members working for Google than Facebook! #awkward ;)." Randi previously worked for Facebook before becoming a producer for Bravo's reality TV show Silicon Valley.

Google reps have not specified how much the company spent on the Wildfire acquisition, though TechCrunch has reported several sources believe "the sale price was around $250 million."

"It’s a platform for brands to manage their pages, apps, tweets, videos, sponsorships, ads, promotions and more, all in one place," Jason Miller, Product Management Director for Google, wrote on the company's blog. "With Wildfire, we’re looking forward to creating new opportunities for our clients to engage with people across all social services."

This acquisition does put Google (and maybe Arielle) in an odd spot: Wildfire will be integrated into Google+, but may continue to be used by companies like Facebook, meaning Google could profit from Wildfire while it's social networking nemesis does, too. "Google would be in the interesting position of writing one of its biggest rivals an indirect check," CNN writes.

So do you think the Zuckerberg siblings will play nice? Will Facebook continue its Wildfire partnership? Sound off in the comments.

[Hat Tip: Business Insider]

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  • The Winklevoss Twins

    The infamous Winklevoss twins have been giving Mark Zuckerberg grief ever since Facebook's launch back in 2004. The pair and a business partner (more on him later) commissioned Mark Zuckerberg to program a social networking site they had founded called ConnectU, but they later alleged in a lawsuit that Zuckerberg ripped off their idea and launched Thefacebook (later, Facebook) instead. After settling with the company for $65 million in cash and stock, the twins claimed that Facebook misled them about the value of the company's stock. They appealed the settlement <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/05/16/winklevoss-twins-appeal-denied-circuit-court_n_862758.html" target="_hplink">all the way up to the Ninth U.S. Circuit Court</a> -- just one appeal shy of the Supreme Court -- before <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2011/06/22/winklevoss-twins-facebook-lawsuit_n_882618.html" target="_hplink">throwing in the towel in June 2011</a>.

  • Divya Narendra

    Divya Narendra partnered with the Winklevoss twins on their ConnectU project during their time at Harvard. Narendra fought Zuckerberg in court alongside the twins and <a href="http://techcrunch.com/2010/05/21/connectu-co-founder-launches-professional-investment-community-sumzero/" target="_hplink">founded his own investor community, called SumZero,</a> before claiming his share of the $65 million settlement with the social network. A plotline in the film "The Social Network," which dramatized Facebook's founding, portrayed the Harvard students' working relationship and subsequent fallout with Zuckerberg.

  • Eduardo Saverin

    Here's another name you probably recognize from "The Social Network." The film portrayed Zuck's deteriorating friendship with Facebook co-founder and fellow Harvard student Eduardo Saverin, culminating in a blatant betrayal on the part of Zuckerberg that ended his working relationship with Saverin. <a href="a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/how-mark-zuckerberg-booted-his-co-founder-out-of-the-company-2012-5?page=1" target="_hplink"" target="_hplink">A new piece by Business Insider indicates</a> that Saverin may not have been as much of a victim. As noted by BI, Zuckerberg planned to cut Saverin out of the company because he had failed to secure funding or set up a business model and had used the social network to run free ads for Joboozle, a side-project Saverin had developed. (<a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/how-mark-zuckerberg-booted-his-co-founder-out-of-the-company-2012-5?page=1" target="_hplink">Business Insider also published emails and instant messages</a>, purportedly written by Zuckerberg, that shed light on the methods Zuck used to oust Saverin and dilute his shares in the company.) After a 2009 settlement with Facebook, Saverin retains an <a href="http://www.forbes.com/profile/eduardo-saverin/" target="_hplink">estimated five percent stake in the company</a>. (His original stake was higher than 30 percent.) He recently <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2012/05/11/eduardo-saverin-us-citizenship_n_1510099.html" target="_hplink">renounced his U.S. citizenship</a>, presumably to avoid the capital gains taxes on the profit he stands to make off Facebook's imminent IPO.

  • Sean Parker

    Napster creator Sean Parker, who also served as Facebook's first president, played a huge role in the development of the social network. <a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/mark-zuckerberg-2012-5/index3.html" target="_hplink">According to Henry Blodget's recent profile of Mark Zuckerberg</a>, Parker was also instrumental in securing Zuck's power over the company. However, <a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/mark-zuckerberg-2012-5/index3.html" target="_hplink">as Blodget explains</a>, despite Parker's contributions, Zuck and the company cut him loose a year after his arrival due to his "<a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/mark-zuckerberg-2012-5/index3.html" target="_hplink">party-boy ways</a>."

  • Owen Van Natta

    Zuckerberg also had a hand in the departure of Owen Van Natta, Facebook's former chief operating officer and the <a href="http://allthingsd.com/20080219/owen-van-natta-to-leave-facebook/" target="_hplink">mind behind big deals</a> like Microsoft's $240 million investment in the social network. "His greatest strength was deal-making, not management," <a href="http://nymag.com/news/features/mark-zuckerberg-2012-5/index3.html " target="_hplink">writes Henry Blodget</a>. "In early 2008, in the wake of the disastrous launch of an advertising product called Beacon, Facebook's senior team determined that the company needed a different kind of executive running the business." <a href="http://allthingsd.com/20080219/owen-van-natta-to-leave-facebook/" target="_hplink">AllThingsD's Kara Swisher notes that</a> Van Natta had long been gunning for a CEO spot, which he was unlikely to find a Facebook. "He has said to me many times that he had been hesitant to come to Facebook then, as he had been looking for a CEO job at the time," wrote Swisher when Van Natta left Facebook.