The IOC might want to send German rower Nadja Drygalla home with a copy of the Olympic Charter, asking her to show her boyfriend the sixth of seven "Fundamental Principles Of Olympism." A member of women's eight crew team that was eliminated earlier this week, Drygalla has left the Olympic Village after reports at home have alleged that her boyfriend is a member of an extremist political party inspired by the Nazis.

Principles Of Olympism

6. Any form of discrimination with regard to a country or a person on grounds of race, religion, politics, gender or otherwise is incompatible with belonging to the Olympic Movement.


Michael Vesper, the head of Germany's Olympic Association told the Associated Press that Drygalla is "committed to the values of the Olympic charter" but the 23-year-old is still leaving London in order to keep her love interest from becoming a "burden for the Olympic team."

According to Reuters, media reports in Germany have identified Drygalla's boyfriend as a member of the "Rostock National Socialists." Per The Guardian, Reuters and various media outlets, German's intelligence agency describes the far-right group as being racist and inspired by the Nazis.

Sadly, Drygalla's early departure from London is not the first time that racism has been a topic of conversation during the 2012 Olympics. Before the Games even got underway, Greek triple jumper Voula Papachristou was expelled from her national team for a racist tweet. Papachristou reportedly also had ties to a far-right political group. During the Games, the Nigerian basketball team was subjected to racist taunts by fans of the Lithuanian team.

Perhaps the IOC should be handing out copies of that charter to everyone.

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BERLIN -- German Olympic officials said Friday that a rower had left the London Games after a broadcaster reported that her boyfriend is a supporter of an extreme right-wing party in Germany.

Nadja Drygalla, a member of the women's eight crew, planned to leave the Olympic village to avoid any "burden for the Olympic team," said Michael Vesper, general director of the national Olympic association.

Vesper said he and German rowing officials met with Drygalla, who "stressed credibly" she is "committed to the values of the Olympic charter."

International Olympic Committee spokesman Mark Adams said he did not think it was an issue for the IOC "because she hasn't said or done anything related to the games."

Drygalla was done competing at the games after the women's eight team failed to make Thursday's final.

Drygalla is a former police trainee. The state interior ministry in Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania said it learned last year that her acquaintances included people who belong to the far-right scene.

A ministry statement said that "intensive talks" were held with Drygalla and she resigned from the force last September.